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I have a project, which rewrite urls via .htaccess. I want to load the title and a content-div of all pages asynchronously via javascript/ jquery and want to avoid two responses (one for the title and one for the content-div). I'm sure, there is a way in javascript, but I thought of an php-file, that return an array of this two elements after an ajax-request.

For this concept, i need to get the 'real', rewritten url.

Is there a way to pass a string through the htaccess-file an get the rewritten one as an output?

I thought about the exec-function:

$url = 'example/2/info';
exec("ln -s .htaccess -i $url",$output);
print_r($output);

... but this doesn't work.

Edit, further explanation (Part II):

By clicking on a link, javascript grabs the href of the link and send it as a string (e. g. 'example/2/info') to a php-file (e. g. ajax.php). In the ajax.php should the requested site generated and scanned for the title-tag and the content-div. Then these two elements will send as an array back to the browser. To generate this site in the ajax.php, the rewritten url (like 'example.php?page=2&subpage=info') is necessary, to get all $_GET-parameters and script-file-names.

share|improve this question
    
I didn't understand, By real you mean URL which users use or the one goes to php? –  undone Jul 30 '12 at 12:23
    
So why do you need the rewritten URL? You just do an AJAX request from JavaScript to ajax.php (for example), which returns a JSON encoded array of the data that you need. Does the .htaccess redirect the request to an index.php which redirects it again to ajax.php? –  Mihai Todor Jul 30 '12 at 12:32
    
If you print_r($_SERVER); you will see that the information you want is already in PHP, no need to inspect the .htaccess. The URI the user typed into the browser is there, and the rewritten URI is there. I'll leave it to you to find out exactly where... And on a side note, what logic led you to conclude that symlinking the .htaccess would help anything? –  DaveRandom Jul 30 '12 at 12:40
    
The ajax send a string like 'example/2/info' to the ajax.php. In the ajax.php should the requested site generated and scanned for the title-tag and the content-div. To generate this site in the ajax.php, the rewritten url (like 'example.php?page=2&subpage=info') is necessary, to get all $_GET-parameters and script-file-names. –  Olli Jul 30 '12 at 12:49
    
@Olli Well, ajax.php is executed after the request passes through .htaccess. Try debugging $_REQUEST as @DaveRandom suggested. Since it's an AJAX call, it might be hard for you to see the response. The quick & dirty way to debug it is file_put_contents('debug.txt', print_r($_REQUEST, true)), but make sure that the directory where you placed ajax.php is writable. –  Mihai Todor Jul 30 '12 at 14:08

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