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A union in C++98 cannot contain a class that has virtual functions or nontrivial constructors or destructors.

what are the situations you know where the use of POD is must?

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For a start, whenever you interface a "lower-level" component (graphics, metadata, audio) etc. –  Paul de Lange Jul 30 '12 at 13:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

parsing some structures in binary files, for example

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How much real advantage is there to parsing a binary file by overlaying it with a PODS, versus using functions like int get_int16(uint8_t char **pp, uint8_t *end_of_buffer) {unsigned char *p = *pp; if (p+2 <= end_of_buffer) {*pp = p+22; return p[0]+256*p[1];} else {handle error}} to parse out the data? Note that unlike the PODS-based approach, the function-based approach is byte-order agnostic. –  supercat Aug 20 '12 at 23:17

The syntax

X a = {1, 2, 3};

only works with PODs, although this restriction is lifted with std::initializer_list in C++11.

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1  
-1 No, it works (in C++03) in general for aggregates. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 30 '12 at 13:16
1  
Aggregate initialisation requires X to be an aggregate type, not necessarily POD. –  Mike Seymour Jul 30 '12 at 13:16
    
@Cheers You are always welcome to correct factual errors in my answers. –  FredOverflow Jul 30 '12 at 16:24
    
@Fred: the idea was, that you would correct, then I'd remove the downvote, yes? less work for me, you see. ;-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 30 '12 at 18:10

When interacting with a non C++ API (typically a C style API).

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Uhm, no, although the types required by any existing C interface are necessarily POD. For example, you can pass pointers to non-POD types, plus pointers to functions that operate on values, to C code. Which is then happy. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 30 '12 at 13:26

One case where PODness is required is for direct conversion to/from sequence of bytes.

Another case where PODness is required is where the type must guarantee that instantiation has no effect whatsoever other than using a bit of memory, e.g. as in the following class:

namespace detail {
    using std::vector;

    template< class Type, Podness::Enum podNess = Podness::isPod >
    class ValueWrapper_
    {
    private:
        Type    v_;

    public:
        Type const& ref() const { return v_; }

        ValueWrapper_() {}       // No initialization
        ValueWrapper_( Type const v ): v_( v ) {}
    };

    template< class Type >
    struct ValueWrapper_< Type, Podness::isNotPod >
    {
    private:
        vector<Type>    v_;     // General but incurs allocation overhead.

    public:
        Type const& ref() const { return v_[0]; }

        ValueWrapper_() {}       // Supports apparent no initialization.
        ValueWrapper_( Type const v ): v_( 1, v ) {}
    };
}    // namespace detail

template< class Type >
class Optional_
{
private:
    typedef detail::ValueWrapper_<Type, Podness_<Type>::value > Wrapper;

    Wrapper const   value_;
    bool const      isNone_;

    Optional_& operator=( Optional_ const& );         // No such.

public:
    bool isNone() const { return isNone_; }

    Type const& value() const
    {
        hopefully( !isNone_ )
            || throwX( "Optional_::value(): there is no value" );
        return value_.ref();
    }

    Optional_(): isNone_( true ) {}
    Optional_( Type const& v ): value_( v ), isNone_( false ) {}

    static Optional_ none() { return Optional_(); }
};

template<>
class Optional_< void >
{
private:
    Optional_& operator=( Optional_ const& );         // No such.

public:
    bool isNone() const { return true; }

    void value() const
    {
        throwX( "Optional_::value(): there is no value" );
    }

    Optional_() {}
    static Optional_ none() { return Optional_(); }
};

Hm, I can't think of any third case…

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Parsing comms protocols is another one.

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