Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have 3 models named:

Pencil having Pencil.Id(int) and Pencil.Colors(IEnumerable) Property

Pen having Pen.Id(int) and Pen.Colors(IEnumerable) Property

Colors having Id and name.

Pencil has a relation with colors (many-to-many) Pen has a relation with colors (many-to-many)

I want to build a query which will show me the same colored pencils for the pen that I am holding.

I am using the below LINQ-to-Entities query:

int id = id_of_the_pen_that_i_am_holding;
Pen p = db.Pens.Find(id);
var list = from m in db.Pencils where m.Colors.Intersect(p.Colors) != null select m;

Colors model is IEnumerable so it has more than 1 color. For example; the pen has 15 different colors and pencil is having 25 different colors. I want to bring the corresonding pencil if one of the colors of the pen that I am holding is also avaialable in the color palette of that pencil.

But I am getting an exception to use regular variables like int or string rather than objects.

What can I do? Thanks in advance for your helps.

EDITED: I've created a new question for a next possible issue: C# LINQ to Entities- Properties on the intersection set

share|improve this question
    
Are you not over complicating this? Think back to plain SQL (which is what your query will be converted to anyway) can you not instead just say from m in db.Pencils where m.Color = p.Color select m? –  Paul Aldred-Bann Jul 30 '12 at 13:01
    
Color model is IEnumerable so it has more than 1 color. For example A pen has 15 different colors and a pen has 25 different colors. I want to see if one of the colors of the pen is also avaialable in the color scale of the pencil. –  MrGorki Jul 30 '12 at 13:03
    
If your color property is enumerable, then maybe name Colors or Palette will better describe it's intent. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jul 30 '12 at 13:18
    
Have you tried making Color implement IEquatable<Color>? See stackoverflow.com/questions/11285045/… –  arootbeer Jul 30 '12 at 13:22
    
may be you are right –  MrGorki Jul 30 '12 at 18:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
int id = id_of_the_pen_that_i_am_holding;
Pen p = db.Pens.Find(id);
var penColorIds = p.Color.Select(m => m.Id).ToList();
var list = db.Pencils.Where(pencil => pencil.Color.Any(color => penColorIds.Contains(color.Id));
share|improve this answer
    
It works like a charm! Thanks Raphael –  MrGorki Jul 30 '12 at 18:28
    
Hey Raphael. How about getting the list of the colors in the intersection set? I will appreciate if you have a solution for this also. –  MrGorki Aug 1 '12 at 13:24
    
I've just created a new question for this issue: stackoverflow.com/questions/11760499/… –  MrGorki Aug 1 '12 at 13:38

What about simplifying your code and doing it this way, I know it's not particularly elegant but I'm not sure (off the top of my head) whether LINQ has a nice way of doing what you want:

IList<Pencil> sameColorPencils = new List<Pencil>();

Pen p = db.Pens.Find(id);

foreach (Color color in p.Color)
{
    var pencils = from pencil in db.Pencils
                  where pencil.Color == color
                  select pencil;

    foreach (Pencil pencil in pencils)
    {
        if (sameColorPencils.Count(e => e.Id == pencil.Id) == 0)
        {
            sameColorPencils.Add(pencils);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It is a good approach but I don't know if its performance is good enough. It seems logical but I prefer a direct LINQ query rather than loops. –  MrGorki Jul 30 '12 at 18:29
    
@MrGorki no problem, the accepted answer was a great idea so I learned from that too! –  Paul Aldred-Bann Jul 31 '12 at 10:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.