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I want to make a JUnit test to assure that some classes don't use a specific set of methods (from another classes). Example

class MyClass
{
   void myMethod()
   {
       otherClass.otherClassStaticMethod();
   }
}

class myTest
{
    void test()
    {
        assertFalse(CalledMethods.getMethodsCalledBy("myClass.myMethod").Contains("otherClass.otherClassStaticMethod"));
    }
}

In this test I want to assure that myMethod doesn't invocate otherClassStaticMethod. How can I find what methods are being called inside a method in compile time (ignore methods called using reflection)? I thought about a .java parser, do you recommend any?

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2  
Checking method invocations is typically used to assure that certain methods of an underlying layer are invoked or not during a Unit-Test. For that puupose you can use Mockito, EasyMock, etc. If you want to enforce the programmer not to use a certain API at all you should think about using static code analysis tools like PMD or CheckStyle. –  coding.mof Jul 30 '12 at 13:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can mock "otherClass" and verify that the method isn't invoked. E.g. using Mockito you can even specify in which order what methods are supposed to be invoked (under the condition their instances are mocks) and specify which methods are not allowed to be invoked

as coding.mof said, to mock static methods you should use PowerMock/PowerMockito:

example:

PowerMockito.mockStatic(OtherClass.class);

PowerMockito.verifyStatic(never());
OtherClass.otherClassStaticMethod();
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For the static methods you would need the PowerMock extension of Mockito. –  coding.mof Jul 30 '12 at 13:05

It sounds like you should be using a mock library and let that handle it all for you. I'd recommend JMock as my library of choice. If you're using instance methods then this would be perfect for you - if, as your example shows, it's static methods then PowerMock may work*1.

With JMock, you'd have something like:

public class MyClass {
    public MyClass(Dependency dependency) {
        this.dependency = dependency;
    }

    void myMethod() {
        dependency.someMethod();
    }
}

@RunWith(JMock.class)
public class MyTest {
    private Mockery context = new Mockery();

    @Test
    public void doesNotCallSomeMethod() {
        Dependency dependency = context.mock(Dependency.class);
        MyClass obj = new MyClass(dependency);

        obj.myMethod();  <--- this will fail fast
    }
}

When you call obj.myMethod, JMock will instantly report that you never said dependency should have any methods called. It will also tell you what method you DID call and what parameters you passed in if any

*1 I don't use PowerMock as I steer away from static methods unless they are pure functions

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