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I would like to have only 1 domain name user view my site (username1). So far I cant get this to work correctly. Either everyone has access or no one has access.

Webconfig:

 <authentication mode="Windows">

IIS setting:

Anonymous - disabled
Windows Authentication - enabled

sites folder permission settings:

IIS_USER (domain\iis_user) - no access
domain\username1 - read access 
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

"finds the first access rule that fits a particular user account" Try using the web.config. And put domain\username1 allow first followed by <deny users="*"/>

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You need to set identity impersonate to true in your web.config. That will pass the user information into the WindowsIdentity object (rather than just the User object). The WindowsIdentity object is used in determining access to files and folders.

<configuration>
  <system.web>
    <identity impersonate="true" />
  </system.web>
</configuration>

More information can be found at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/134ec8tc.aspx

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If I add this, do I delete authentication mode=windows? –  user999690 Jul 30 '12 at 13:16
    
No. Windows authentication mode sets the User object based in your Windows login. You could take it out, since IIS defaults to Windows authentication, but it'd be better to leave it in. This is an additional configuration to set the WindowsIdentity object to the user's login. –  saluce Jul 30 '12 at 14:16

You can add an authorization rule to allow or deny specific groups/people from within IIS. File permissions will still apply though. Also, just a side note, we also allow digest authentication. YMMV.

Here's a walkthrough on IIS Authorization Rules.

http://www.iis.net/ConfigReference/system.webServer/security/authorization

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