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I have a custom alias for git that I use with git df (it’s basically a shortcut for git diff).

However, with git’s zsh autocorrect, everytime I use git df in a directory that contains a db directory, I get this:

% ls
app/ config/ db/ lib/ log/ spec/

% git alias | grep "df"
df = diff

% git df
zsh: correct 'df' to 'db' [nyae]?

Is there a way I could make zsh aware of my git aliases so it takes them into account when trying to autocorrect my commands? I want it to detect that git df exist and not suggest me git db instead.

I don’t want to create a zsh alias (eg. alias gdf="git diff") or use alias git="nocorrect git".

Thanks for your help!

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I believe it is easier to disable autocorrection completely: I have not ever seen it correcting something other then file names. And things like srun command/cave resolve package with having .command/.package configuration directory are really disgusting. There are too much commands like this to add an alias for each of them. –  ZyX Jul 30 '12 at 17:33
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At first I thought it was a crazy idea to disable it completely but then I realized that autocorrect was not the same as autocompletion. I like autocompletion, but lately autocorrect has been getting in my way . I disabled it with unsetopt correct_all and we’ll see how it goes. Thanks for the suggestion! –  remi Jul 30 '12 at 21:05

3 Answers 3

Git has an autocorrect feature:

git config --global help.autocorrect 

Will wait 2s before autocorrecting:

git config --global help.autocorrect 2 

I think that if you want to implement this feature in zsh you will have to change the git completion function directly.

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You can force zsh to rebuild the autocorrect cache by running the command hash -rf or rehash. That fixed my problem when zsh was autocorrecting to the wrong thing.

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1  
This is different: it commands hash containing “command name” - “path to binary” relation as well as “named directory” - “actual path”. Your command won’t fix autocorrections in this case, it may fix only automatic corrections of commands. –  ZyX Jul 31 '12 at 4:28

Sometimes, I find that auto correct gets a bit annoying. So I do in my ~/.zshrc,

DISABLE_CORRECTION="true"

This disables the auto correct feature. Otherwise, you could do

alias git="nocorrect git" 

but you seem to be averse to that

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