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I have the code below. I'd like to convert all items in this list to uppercase.

Is there a way to do this in Linq ?

public class Person
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}

public class MyClass
{
    List<Person> myList = new List<Person>{ 
        new Person { FirstName = "Aaa", LastName = "BBB", Age = 2 },
        new Person{ FirstName = "Deé", LastName = "ève", Age = 3 }
    };
}

Update

I don't want to loop or go field by field. Is there a way by reflection to uppercase the value for each property?

share|improve this question
    
You can use List.ForEach for that but this is only the replacement of a foreach loop. Linq is not about making changes to your data objects but making queries. –  Amiram Korach Jul 30 '12 at 13:50
    
Why not normalize the name during object creation? –  user7116 Jul 30 '12 at 13:52
    
@Kris-I: why you need such generic approach, do you have tons of objects and you won't writing for each one special loop/method to upper case strign properties? –  sll Jul 30 '12 at 14:02
1  
@Kris-I: your update does not make any sense. If you have N objects with M properties, you will need call a method which will loop at least MIN(N,M) times making M*N method calls. Even with reflection you will loop... –  user7116 Jul 30 '12 at 14:04
    
Can we have a clarification here? Sounds like you want a generic method to do the job for you, do you wish it to alter the underlying data or do you wish it to provide a new item? –  Bob Vale Jul 30 '12 at 14:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Why would you like to use LINQ?

Use List<T>.ForEach:

myList.ForEach(z =>
                {
                    z.FirstName = z.FirstName.ToUpper();
                    z.LastName = z.LastName.ToUpper();
                });

EDIT: no idea why you want to do this by reflection (I wouldn't do this personally...), but here's some code that'll uppercase all properties that return a string. Do note that it's far from being perfect, but it's a base for you in case you really want to use reflection...:

public class Person
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }

    public string LastName { get; set; }

    public int Age { get; set; }
}

public static class MyHelper
{
    public static void UppercaseClassFields<T>(T theInstance)
    {
        if (theInstance == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException();
        }

        foreach (var property in theInstance.GetType().GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance))
        {
            var theValue = property.GetValue(theInstance, null);
            if (theValue is string)
            {
                property.SetValue(theInstance, ((string)theValue).ToUpper(), null);
            }
        }
    }

    public static void UppercaseClassFields<T>(IEnumerable<T> theInstance)
    {
        if (theInstance == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException();
        }

        foreach (var theItem in theInstance)
        {
            UppercaseClassFields(theItem);
        }
    }
}

public class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<Person> myList = new List<Person>{
            new Person { FirstName = "Aaa", LastName = "BBB", Age = 2 },
            new Person{ FirstName = "Deé", LastName = "ève", Age = 3 }
        };

        MyHelper.UppercaseClassFields<Person>(myList);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but no properties by properties, or loop. See my update1 –  Kris-I Jul 30 '12 at 13:56
    
@Kris-I See updated answer –  ken2k Jul 30 '12 at 14:06
1  
@BobVale Yes it will. As it'll throw an exception if a property has no setter. It's an idea, not a copy-paste-ready solution ;) –  ken2k Jul 30 '12 at 14:16
1  
Also why the double generics? Can you not just declare the signature public static void UppercaseClassFields<T>(IEnumerable<T> theInstance) –  Bob Vale Jul 30 '12 at 14:17
1  
@BobVale Completely agree for the double generics. Editing the code example. –  ken2k Jul 30 '12 at 14:19

LINQ does not provide any facilities to update underlying data. Using LINQ, you can create a new list from an existing one:

// I would say this is overkill since creates a new object instances and 
// does ToList()
var updatedItems = myList.Select(p => new Person 
                              {
                                FirstName = p.FirstName.ToUpper(), 
                                LastName = p.LastName.ToUpper(), 
                                Age = p.Age
                              })
                         .ToList();

If using LINQ is not principal, I would suggest using a foreach loop.

UPDATE:

Why you need such solution? Only one way of doing this in generic manner - reflection.

share|improve this answer
    
What about List<T>.ForEach? –  davenewza Jul 30 '12 at 13:52
1  
@davenewza that's not a LINQ method. –  Jesse C. Slicer Jul 30 '12 at 13:53
    
Right, this is a case (not LINQ one) –  sll Jul 30 '12 at 13:53
1  
Why are You calling ToList() at the end?? It will execute the query immediately! The reason why Linq is so beautiful is because it is built upon "yield return" of "foreach". Almost each linq method returns IEnumerable (IQuerable) which allows You to chain many methods and the query will not get executed until You will need to iterate over that IEnumerable (IQuerable) or untill You call ToList(), ToArray(), AsEnumerable() etc explicitly (in this case You loose magic of "yeild return") –  Aleksei Chepovoi Aug 29 '13 at 16:19
1  
@Aleksei: Sometimes you have to execute a linq query immediately to do a snapshot of a data set and return to a caller, sometimes you need ToList() to conform with an existing API return/input data type. In this case it is to conform with an example in original question which uses List<Person>, possilbel overkill of ToList() is the comment. –  sll Aug 31 '13 at 13:24

You can only really use linq to provide a list of new objects

var upperList = myList.Select(p=> new Person {
   FirstName = (p.FirstName == null) ? null : p.FirstName.ToUpper(),
   LastName = (p.LastName == null) ? null : p.LastName.ToUpper(),
   Age = p.Age
   }).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but no properties by properties, or loop. See my update1 –  Kris-I Jul 30 '12 at 13:57
p.lastname.ToString().ToUpper().Contains(TextString)
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