Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have trouble writing a recursive function in C:

void func(int n)

which for a given number n prints "1" and n zeroes after it.

for example:

func(3);

prints: 1000

func(5);

prints: 100000

No global variables (outside the function) are allowed and argument count must not be increased. No other helper functions allowed.

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by Gregory Pakosz, Kerrek SB, ouah, ugoren, Graviton Jul 31 '12 at 8:32

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Is this homework? And what have you tried? –  Eric Finn Jul 30 '12 at 13:54
    
Is this homework? –  Levon Jul 30 '12 at 13:54
    
@EricFinn I don't know how to detect that it is the first time the function has been called to print the "1". The zeroes are not a problem to be print. –  Glad To Help Jul 30 '12 at 13:57
    
If you know the answer, please do post it –  Glad To Help Jul 30 '12 at 13:58
2  
@GladToHelp You answered neither of my questions. –  Eric Finn Jul 30 '12 at 14:00

5 Answers 5

up vote -1 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>

void func(int k){
  if(k==0){
    printf("1");
    return;
  }
  func(k-1);
  printf("0");
}

int main(){
  func(3);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
7  
Giving out homework answers like this denies the asker the opportunity to learn. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jul 30 '12 at 14:01
    
this doesn't even work.. it prints the 1 last –  John Corbett Jul 30 '12 at 14:03
2  
@JohnCorbett Trace through, line by line. –  Eric Finn Jul 30 '12 at 14:06
    
right, I wasn't thinking :P silly me, recursion prevents the 0s from being printed until the end –  John Corbett Jul 30 '12 at 14:08
    
this code misses the trick which was intended by the professor for his students. –  Aftnix Jul 30 '12 at 14:23

Just some pointers:

  1. Why do you think you must print "1" only on the first call of the function?
  2. Why can't you print it on the last call of the recursive function and then print all the 0's?
  3. How will you determine if a call to the function is the last call in the recursive way? (Can the value of "n" hold the answer?)
share|improve this answer
    
1. Alright I saw the answer, I guess I had a bad idea 2. same as 1. 3. Well in some cases "n" (the argument) can hold the answer. For example, if I needed 000001 instead of 100000 I could detect if it is the last call by checking if n == 0 –  Glad To Help Jul 30 '12 at 14:04
    
@GladToHelp, In this case also if (n == 0) can help, if you utilize recursion effectively to print 1 first and then 0s. : ) –  Jay Jul 30 '12 at 14:11
    
agreed. I already saw the solution (correct answer). –  Glad To Help Jul 30 '12 at 14:13

I would suggest you look into static variables. you could set a static variable to tell if your function is being called recursively or not. If you're not allowed to use global variables, it's just a tricky work-around. And when your recursion is done, just set it back for the next call.

share|improve this answer
1  
Sorry, but that is terrible advice. –  Happy Green Kid Naps Jul 30 '12 at 14:09
    
It will work, but it would be quite unusual approach. –  Glad To Help Jul 30 '12 at 14:13

You can solve this problem using two functions, for example func and func_rec. func will print the 1 and it will once call the recursive function func_rec which will print only zeros (recursively).

share|improve this answer
    
The point was to use only one function with only one argument –  Glad To Help Jul 30 '12 at 14:12
    
@GladToHelp That limitation wasn't specified in the question. –  Eric Finn Jul 30 '12 at 14:16
#include <stdio.h>

void func(int n)
{
    static one = 1;
    if (one == 1){
        printf("1");
        one--;
        func(n - 1);
    }
    else {
        if (n < 0){
            printf("\n");
            return;
        }
        else {
            printf("0");
            func(n - 1);
        }
    }
}

int main() {
    func(5);
    return 0;
}

The code is very trivial so, even it seems that its a homework, i'm giving out the code.

Your earlier question suggests that you are not so much into c coding. What i'm trying to do is to reduce your frustration by giving out the code, but with a twist.

Please answer us why the code i've given is not a "pure" function? why this solution should be discarded with ones which have global storage.

You should learn this stuff, its pretty interesting :)

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.