Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want each (small) file specified with ARGV read in its own array. If I don't test $ARGV, <> will slurp all files in a single table. Is there a better/shorter/simpler way of doing it?

# invocation: ./prog.pl *.txt

@table = ();
$current = "";
while (<>)
{
  if ($ARGV ne $current)
  {
    @ar = ();
    $current = $ARGV;
    if ($current)
    {
      push @table, \@ar;
    }
  }
  push @ar;
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Please always use strict and use warnings at the top of your programs, and declare variables close to their first point of use using my.

It is simplest to test end of file on the ARGV filehandle to determine when a new file is about to be opened.

This code uses a state variable $eof to record whether the previous file has been completely read to avoid unnecessarily adding a new element to the @table array when the end of the @ARGV list is reached.

use strict;
use warnings;

my @table;
my $eof = 1;

while (<>) {
  chomp;
  push @table, [] if $eof;
  push @{$table[-1]}, $_;
  $eof = eof;
}

@Alan Haggai Alavi's idea of incrementing an index at end of file instead of setting a flag is far better as it avoids the need to explicitly create an empty array at the start of each file.

Here is my take on his solution, but it is completely dependent on Alan's post and he should gete the credit for it.

use strict;
use warnings;

my @table;
my $index = 0;

while (<>) {
  chomp;
  push @{$table[$index]}, $_;
  $index++ if eof;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I always use strict and use warnings... when complexity warrants it :-) –  Philippe A. Jul 30 '12 at 14:33
1  
it happens fairly often that people will present a one-liner that they think shows a bug in perl, when the bug is in their code and would have been revealed by warnings. you could make an argument that one-liners don't need strict 'vars', but for warnings and the other parts of strict, lack of complexity doesn't mean you should skip them. –  ysth Jul 30 '12 at 14:49
    
@PhilippeA.: That is a dangerous approach to take. It is just when you think nothing can go wrong that it does go wrong because you have become complacent –  Borodin Jul 30 '12 at 14:59
    
That said, I like your solution consisting of a single block and reminding me that $table[-1] can save me a few declarations. –  Philippe A. Jul 30 '12 at 15:57
    
I have been caught by bugs in "simple" programs that I felt didn't need strict –  justintime Jul 30 '12 at 16:31

A hash for array refs of files:

my %files;
while (<>) {
  push @{$files{$ARGV}}, $_;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not a bad answer. For my particular problem I needed to load everything in an array. I omitted this detail from my question. Sorry! –  Philippe A. Aug 1 '12 at 14:20

The eof function can be used to detect the end of each file:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @files;
my $file_ctr = 0;
while (<>) {
    chomp;
    push @{ $files[$file_ctr] }, $_;
}
continue { $file_ctr++ if eof }

Relevant documentation:

In a while (<>) loop, eof or eof(ARGV) can be used to detect the end of each file, whereas eof() will detect the end of the very last file only.

share|improve this answer
1  
No need to close ARGV unless you need a per-file value for $. –  Borodin Jul 30 '12 at 14:32
    
I have edited it out. Thank you. :-) –  Alan Haggai Alavi Jul 30 '12 at 14:36

You can leverage File::Slurp to avoid opening and closing the files yourself.

use strict;
use warnings;

use File::Slurp;

my @table = ();

foreach my $arg ( @ARGV ) {
   push @table, read_file( $arg, array_ref => 1 );
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.