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I have a string below

Properties | Account Property | Actions Property | Anniversary Property | Application Property | AssistantName Property | AssistantDNA Property | LabDNA....

and from a linux shell would like to find a command to process it to below format. I want to only show words that have DNA in them. The point for me here is seeing how to do this from a prompt.

AssistantDNA
LabDNA
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Your question isn't understandable for me... –  René Kolařík Jul 30 '12 at 14:19
    
let me try to rephrase –  user391986 Jul 30 '12 at 14:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Perhaps something like:

egrep -oi '[^ ]*dna[^ ]*' file
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thanks! I think it's working but i'm not getting the full word, only dna shows up in the list –  user391986 Jul 30 '12 at 14:22
    
Fixed, forgot to negate the brackets. –  tvm Jul 30 '12 at 14:26
    
You don't need to escape the spaces inside bracket expressions. –  ghoti Jul 30 '12 at 15:48
    
In fact, the backslash is taken literally inside brackets. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 30 '12 at 17:08
    
Fixed it, point taken. –  tvm Jul 30 '12 at 18:39

awk alternative:

awk -v RS='|' '/DNA/'
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echo "Properties | Account Property | Actions Property | Anniversary Property | Application Property | AssistantName Property | AssistantDNA Property | LabDNA" | tr '|' '\n' | grep DNA

prints

AssistantDNA Property 
LabDNA

First replace the | with a new line, then use normal grep.

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Use an Extended Regular Expression

Assuming that your data is in a file named /tmp/foo, you can use egrep or grep -E (depending on your system) to match just the words you want with an extended regular expression:

egrep --only-matching --ignore-case '\b[[:alnum:]]+dna\b' /tmp/foo | sort

The sort pipeline at the end will just sort the results alphabetically for you. It certainly isn't necessary, based on your stated requirements.

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grep -Po "\S*DNA\S*" yourFile

test:

kent$  echo "Properties | Account Property | Actions Property | Anniversary Property | Application Property | AssistantName Property | AssistantDNA Property | LabDNA...."|grep -Po "\S*DNA\S*"
AssistantDNA
LabDNA....
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