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I want to be able to just, right click a method, type in some parameter values, and test it (or something like that).

I have looked at the build-in MVC unit testing in Visual-Studio, but gave up learning it.. it just seems like an awful lot of trouble to go through just to test a small simple method. I'm sure there's a really good reason to use it, when creating serious projects.

But is there a quick & dirty alternative?


A cool solution would be, a window in visual-studio, where you (with intellisense!) was able to write something like:

HelloWorld obj = new HelloWorld();
obj.Print();

Click run, and have the reuslt shown to you immediately. Just like the immediate window, but that only works when debugging :(

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1  
Why would you want to just run a test once manually, rather than create a unit test which can verify the behaviour every time you change any code? –  Jon Skeet Jul 30 '12 at 14:25
    
Whoa, I thought you were asking about running test code in an automated testing environment. Well, my answer still applies anyway. But automation is definitely the way to go. –  ashes999 Jul 30 '12 at 14:30

4 Answers 4

You can try TestDriven.NET or CodeRush. Both allow you to test methods with a simple right-click and test (even debug).

I prefer the former (TestDriven.NET), since it allows you to execute arbitrary methods (not just tests) via the test-runner.

Both are compatible with NUnit, and maybe a couple other frameworks (like MbUnit).

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Cool, will check out TestDriven! –  BjarkeCK Jul 30 '12 at 14:26
    
Damn they both look awesome, but they are expensive :(! –  BjarkeCK Jul 30 '12 at 14:41
1  
TestDriven.NET is free if you work on an open-source project. That's how I got my license. –  ashes999 Jul 30 '12 at 14:42
    
TestDriven.NET Was exatyly what i was looking for, easy to test methods without knowing anything about nunit xD great. –  BjarkeCK Jul 30 '12 at 17:18

SnippetCompiler or LinqPad are the best alternatives I know. This Stack Overflow post discusses them.

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Yeah those are awesome, and i use LINQPad myselvf, but i don't think you can attach a class library to it or a project? –  BjarkeCK Jul 30 '12 at 14:24
    
You can add an external project as a reference (F4), but I admit it's a clumbsy workflow. –  neontapir Jul 30 '12 at 14:28

The unit-test window from ReSharper is much better than the "normal" unit-test support in visual studio. Check it out: http://www.jetbrains.com/resharper/features/unit_testing.html

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Looks, really really cool, installing now, thanks! –  BjarkeCK Jul 30 '12 at 14:42

Okay, so i tried out unit testing and gave it a good shot, and i hated it...

I needed to use the HttpContext and it was a pain in the ass to make that work when unit testing. So i wrote my own testing environment in MVC, it's quite simple:

Your put on a attribute on the method you want testet, you build you project, and you refresh a page h**p://localhost/test to see the output of that method.

[QTest]
public string test()
{
    return HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath(@"~\");
}

If anyone should be interested, here is the howto:

  1. Create a custom attribute.

  2. Create a test page, and find all methods in your assembly with an attribute QTest.

  3. Print them out.

My code:

CustomAttribute.cs

public class QTestAttribute : Attribute
{
    public QTestAttribute()
    {
        //Will do so you can define the method paremeter values later on. But for now a emty attribute is fine.
    }
}

Your TestController.cs:

static IEnumerable<Type> GetTypesWithAttribute(Assembly assembly)
{
    foreach (Type type in assembly.GetTypes())
    {
        yield return type;
    }
}
static IEnumerable<MethodInfo> GetMethodsWithAttribute(Type theClass)
{
    foreach (MethodInfo method in theClass.GetMethods())
    {
        if (method.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(QTestAttribute), true).Length > 0)
        {
            yield return method;
        }
    }
}
public ActionResult Index()
{
    IEnumerable<Type> classes = GetTypesWithAttribute(Assembly.LoadFrom(HttpContext.Request.MapPath(@"~\bin\YourProjectName.dll")));
    List<String> tests = new List<string>();
    foreach (var singleClass in classes)
    {
        try
        {
            var a = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().CreateInstance(singleClass.FullName);
            foreach (MethodInfo method in GetMethodsWithAttribute(singleClass))
            {
                tests.Add(method.Invoke(a, null).ToString());
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            try
            {
                tests.Add(ex.InnerException.Message);
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {

            }
        }
    }
    return Content(string.Join("<br>", tests));
}

It's pretty easy to customize, and make it work how you want to, and it's without limitations compared to nunit.

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Well i admit, maybe it's clumbsy to view the results in a browser, but maybe i'll create a add-in, and some functionality... –  BjarkeCK Jul 30 '12 at 20:09

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