Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I found several answers to this in C++ or C#, but none for C.

I need to know how to count the number of characters in a string. The goal is to determine whether there is a closed block (bounded by braces '{', '}') in a string. right now I have the following:

int closedBlock(char* value) {
    int open = 0;

    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < strlen(value); i++) {
        if (!strcmp("{", value[i])) {
            open++;
        } else if (!strcmp("}", value[i])) {
            open--;
        }
    }

    return !open;
}

but it crashes after on the first if check. I'm not really clear on why this does not work. I imagine it has something to do with bad pointers (that seems to always be the problem in C), but I can't figure it out. In addition to working code, and explanation of why mine is bad would be greatly helpful.

Thanks.

NOTE

I am aware that this simply check that the number of '{' is equal to the number of '}', and not truly that there is a properly closed block. I'll solve that problem after I solve this one.

share|improve this question
1  
if (value[i] == '{') value[i] is char, "{" is array of {\0 and value[i] is evaluated for its ascii value so strcmp tries to walk 2 arrays "{" and one at pointer address 57 for example –  jackdoe Jul 30 '12 at 14:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

strcmp will compare two null-terminated strings. It still baffles me that your compiler actually doesn't mutter about the second parameter being a char. If you want to compare a single character just use the equal-operator ==:

int closedBlock(char* value) {
    int open = 0;
    int length = strlen(value);
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        if (value[i] == '{') {
            open++;
        } else if (value[i] == '}') {
            open--;
        }
    }

    return !open;
}

Hint: If you work with gcc add -Wall -Wextra to your compiler call, it will often result in useful warnings.

I am aware that this simply check that the number of '{' is equal to the number of '}', and not truly that there is a properly closed block. I'll solve that problem after I solve this one.

Another hint here: when can there be an invalid block? If and only if the end-token } occurs without a preceding start-token {. You already have all tools for this, you're just missing another if-statement.

share|improve this answer

It's because you're trying to compare a string: "{" against a single character: value[i].

value (presumably) points to an array of characters, while value[i] specifies a single one of those. So you want to compare character-to-character like so:

for (i = 0; i < strlen(value); i++) {
    if (value[i] == '{') {
        open++;
    } else if (value[i] == '}') {
        open--;
    }
}

Note the use of single quotes around the { and }. That tells the compiler it's a single character and not a C-string.

share|improve this answer

why you use strcmp() if you only compare one char?

you can simply use the == operator see my example:

http://ideone.com/dNCH2

best regards kenny

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.