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I have a file called mybundle.txt in c:/temp -

c:/temp/mybundle.txt

How do I load this file into a java.util.ResourceBundle? The file is a valid resource bundle.

This does not seem to work:

java.net.URL resourceURL = null;

String path = "c:/temp/mybundle.txt";
java.io.File fl = new java.io.File(path);

try {
   resourceURL = fl.toURI().toURL();
} catch (MalformedURLException e) {             
}           

URLClassLoader urlLoader = new URLClassLoader(new java.net.URL[]{resourceURL});
java.util.ResourceBundle bundle = java.util.ResourceBundle.getBundle( path , 
                java.util.Locale.getDefault(), urlLoader );
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12 Answers 12

When you say it's "a valid resource bundle" - is it a property resource bundle? If so, the simplest way of loading it probably:

FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream("c:/temp/mybundle.txt");
try {
  return new PropertyResourceBundle(fis);
} finally {
  fis.close();
}
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Hey Jon, doesn't this miss the localization issue that would be the main reason for using a bundle in the first place? –  Nick Holt Jul 23 '09 at 16:29
    
There's no indication that he's actually got more than one file. The fact that it's got a .txt suffix isn't terribly encouraging. But yes, it would fail in that situation. –  Jon Skeet Jul 23 '09 at 16:45
6  
Rather than loading a file manually (i.e. with FileInputStream) and constructing a ProperyResourceBundle, should't the "right way" be to use the ResourceBundle.getBundle(...) method? –  Vihung Feb 24 '12 at 11:51

As long as you name your resource bundle files correctly (with a .properties extension), then this works:

File file = new File("C:\\temp");
URL[] urls = {file.toURI().toURL()};
ClassLoader loader = new URLClassLoader(urls);
ResourceBundle rb = ResourceBundle.getBundle("myResource", Locale.getDefault(), loader);

where "c:\temp" is the external folder (NOT on the classpath) holding the property files, and "myResource" relates to myResource.properties, myResource_fr_FR.properties, etc.

Credit to http://www.coderanch.com/t/432762/java/java/absolute-path-bundle-file

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This answer match exactly. Thanks for sharing. –  jmcollin92 Apr 5 '13 at 8:41
    
Thanks, this is definitely the way to handle a direct path to the class loader for plugins etc... –  Daniel B. Chapman Oct 9 '13 at 18:09

1) Change the extension to properties (ex. mybundle.properties.) 2) Put your file into a jar and add it to your classpath. 3) Access the properties using this code:

ResourceBundle rb = ResourceBundle.getBundle("mybundle");
String propertyValue = rb.getString("key");
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From the JavaDocs for ResourceBundle.getBundle(String baseName):

baseName - the base name of the resource bundle, a fully qualified class name

What this means in plain English is that the resource bundle must be on the classpath and that baseName should be the package containing the bundle plus the bundle name, mybundle in your case.

Leave off the extension and any locale that forms part of the bundle name, the JVM will sort that for you according to default locale - see the docs on java.util.ResourceBundle for more info.

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For JSF Application

Faced similar situation (Required to get resource bundle prop files from a given file path to use them in a JSF app). Added the below code at constructor in a class that extends ResourceBundle to load the bundle from the file path. Specified the class at basename property of loadBundle tag. For basic implementation of extended RB please see the sample at Sample Customized Resource Bundle

    File file = new File("D:\\properties\\i18n");  

           ClassLoader loader=null;
            try {
                URL[] urls = {file.toURI().toURL()};  
                loader = new URLClassLoader(urls); 
    ResourceBundle bundle = getBundle("messages", FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getViewRoot().getLocale(), loader);
                setParent(bundle);
            } catch (MalformedURLException ex) { }

For non JSF applications we just require up-to getting bundle from getBundle method but locale from others source like Locale.getDefault(), the new (RB)class may not require in this case. If multiple file paths then having customized version of RBs to load the bundle from particular filepath and pass the required RB to baseName parameter of getBundle(String baseName) would be a option.

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I would prefer to use the resourceboundle class to load the properties - just to get it done in one line instead of 5 lines code through stream, Properties class and load().

FYI ....

    public void init(ServletConfig servletConfig) throws ServletException {
    super.init(servletConfig);

    try {

            /*** Type1 */
        Properties props = new Properties();

        String fileName = getServletContext().getRealPath("WEB-INF/classes/com/test/my.properties");
    //          stream = Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader().getResourceAsStream(fileName);
    //          stream = ClassLoader.getSystemResourceAsStream("WEB-INF/class/com/test/my.properties");  

        InputStream stream = getServletContext().getResourceAsStream("/WEB-INF/classes/com/test/my.properties");

  //        props.load(new FileInputStream(fileName));
        props.load(stream);

        stream.close();
        Iterator keyIterator = props.keySet().iterator();
        while(keyIterator.hasNext()) {
                String key = (String) keyIterator.next();
                String value = (String) props.getProperty(key);
                System.out.println("key:" + key + " value: " + value);
        }

  /*** Type2:  */
  // Just get it done in one line by rb instead of 5 lines to load the properties
  // WEB-INF/classes/com/test/my.properties file            
  //            ResourceBundle rb = ResourceBundle.getBundle("com.test.my", Locale.ENGLISH, getClass().getClassLoader());
        ResourceBundle rb = ResourceBundle.getBundle("com.ibm.multitool.customerlogs.ui.nl.redirect");
        Enumeration<String> keys = rb.getKeys();
        while(keys.hasMoreElements()) {
            String key = keys.nextElement();
            System.out.println(key + " - " + rb.getObject(key));
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        throw new ServletException("Error loading config.", e);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        throw new ServletException("Error loading config.", e);
    }       

}
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If, like me, you actually wanted to load .properties files from your filesystem instead of the classpath, but otherwise keep all the smarts related to lookup, then do the following:

  1. Create a subclass of java.util.ResourceBundle.Control
  2. Override the newBundle() method

In this silly example, I assume you have a folder at C:\temp which contains a flat list of ".properties" files:

public class MyControl extends Control {
@Override
public ResourceBundle newBundle(String baseName, Locale locale, String format, ClassLoader loader, boolean reload)
        throws IllegalAccessException, InstantiationException, IOException {

    if (!format.equals("java.properties")) {
        return null;
    }

    String bundleName = toBundleName(baseName, locale);
    ResourceBundle bundle = null;

    // A simple loading approach which ditches the package      
    // NOTE! This will require all your resource bundles to be uniquely named!
    int lastPeriod = bundleName.lastIndexOf('.');

    if (lastPeriod != -1) {
        bundleName = bundleName.substring(lastPeriod + 1);
    }
    InputStreamReader reader = null;
    FileInputStream fis = null;
    try {

        File file = new File("C:\\temp\\mybundles", bundleName);

        if (file.isFile()) { // Also checks for existance
            fis = new FileInputStream(file);
            reader = new InputStreamReader(fis, Charset.forName("UTF-8"));
            bundle = new PropertyResourceBundle(reader);
        }
    } finally {
        IOUtils.closeQuietly(reader);
        IOUtils.closeQuietly(fis);
    }
    return bundle;
}

}

Note also that this supports UTF-8, which I believe isn't supported by default otherwise.

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Supporting UTF-8 breaks for .properties files that contain non-ASCII ISO-8859-1 characters (codepoints 128-255), which is legal. ISO-8859-1 represent these with one byte each, while UTF-8 uses two bytes for them. –  Christoffer Hammarström Feb 27 at 11:50

I think that you want the file's parent to be on the classpath, not the actual file itself.

Try this (may need some tweaking):

String path = "c:/temp/mybundle.txt";
java.io.File fl = new java.io.File(path);

try {
   resourceURL = fl.getParentFile().toURL();
} catch (MalformedURLException e) {
   e.printStackTrace();                     
}               

URLClassLoader urlLoader = new URLClassLoader(new java.net.URL[]{resourceURL});
java.util.ResourceBundle bundle = java.util.ResourceBundle.getBundle("mybundle.txt", 
                java.util.Locale.getDefault(), urlLoader );
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The file name should have .properties extension and the base directory should be in classpath. Otherwise it can also be in a jar which is in classpath Relative to the directory in classpath the resource bundle can be specified with / or . separator. "." is preferred.

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If you wanted to load message files for different languages, just use the shared.loader= of catalina.properties... for more info, visit http://theswarmintelligence.blogspot.com/2012/08/use-resource-bundle-messages-files-out.html

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This works for me:

File f = new File("some.properties");
Properties props = new Properties();
FileInputStream fis = null;
try {
    fis = new FileInputStream(f);
    props.load(fis);
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();                    
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} finally {
    if (fis != null) {
        try {
            fis.close();
            fis = null;
        } catch (IOException e2) {
            e2.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}           
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... missed the closing bracket in the finally: –  sius Aug 30 '13 at 15:55
    
adds missing braket –  sius Aug 30 '13 at 15:57
public class One {

    private static One one = null;

    Map<String, String> configParameter = Collections.synchronizedMap(new HashMap<String, String>());

    private One() {
        ResourceBundle rb = ResourceBundle.getBundle("System", Locale.getDefault());

        Enumeration en = rb.getKeys();
        while (en.hasMoreElements()) {
            String key = (String) en.nextElement();
            String value = rb.getString(key);
            configParameter.put(key, value);

        }
    }

    public static One getInstance() {
        if (one == null) {
            one= new One();
        }

        return one;

    }

    public Map<String, String> getParameter() {

        return configParameter;
    }



    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String string = One.getInstance().getParameter().get("subin");
        System.out.println(string);

    }
}
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