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I have created a ThreadManager class that handles Threads and its task is to add new threads and clean up the dead threads. However, the threads that are created remain alive and in ThreadState.WaitSleepJoin state. I have checked that the body has successfully finished execution. Any ideas?

    public bool TryAddThread(ThreadStart threadBody, ThreadStartInfo startInfo)
    {
        bool success = false;

        // Validate arguments
        if (threadBody == null || startInfo == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (!Monitor.TryEnter(_lock) || !_allowNewThreads)
        {
            return false;
        }

        try
        {
            Thread newThread = new Thread(threadBody);

            StartThread(newThread, null, startInfo);

            success = true;
        }
        finally
        {
            Monitor.Exit(_lock);
        }

        return success;
    }

    private void StartThread(Thread newThread, object threadParams, ThreadStartInfo startInfo)
    {
        if (newThread == null || startInfo == null)
        {
            return;
        }

        // Apply start info
        newThread.Name = startInfo.Name;
        newThread.SetApartmentState(startInfo.ApartmentState);
        newThread.IsBackground = startInfo.IsBackground;

        if (threadParams == null)
        {
            newThread.Start();
        }
        else
        {
            newThread.Start(threadParams);
        }

        _threads.Add(newThread);

        RemoveDeadThreads();
    }

    public void RemoveDeadThreads()
    {
        _threads.RemoveAll(t => (!t.IsAlive));
    }

Execution in main thread:

    public void InsertAsync(AP p, APr pr)
    {
        ParameterizedThreadStart thread = new ParameterizedThreadStart(InsertPr);
        List<object> parameters = new List<object>();

        // Create new controller. Must be before the thread to avoid cross-thread operation exception.
        PageController controller = new PageController();
        controller.Initialize(siteWebBrowser);

        parameters.Add(controller);
        parameters.Add(p);
        parameters.Add(pr);
        parameters.Add(_session);

        // If the thread cannot start notify listeners
        if (!_threadManager.TryAddThread(thread, parameters, new ThreadStartInfo("InsertAsync", ApartmentState.STA, true)) && ThreadCreationFailed != null)
        {
            _logger.Error("InsertAsync: Could not start thread.");
            ThreadCreationFailed();
        }

    }

    private static void InsertPr(object o)
    {
        try
        {
            _logger.Debug("Thread start - InsertPr");

            List<object> parameters = (List<object>)o;
            PageController controller = (PageController)parameters[0];
            AP p = (AP)parameters[1];
            APr pr = (APr)parameters[2];
            Session session = (Session)parameters[3];

            if (patient == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("Null patient.");
            }

            session.WaitForHistorySynchronizationSuspension();

            if (Program.ShouldAbortBackgroundOperations)
            {
                throw new Exception("Aborting..");
            }

            session.DoingSomeJob = true;



            controller.ClearCurrent();

            controller.GoToHomePage(3, true);

            controller.ClickNew();


            controller.SearchForP(p.Id);


            try
            {
                controller.WaitUntilDivExists(Constants.NewPrContainerDivId);
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                _logger.Error("InsertAsync: Error while waiting for div '" + Constants.NewPrContainerDivId + "' to appear.");
                throw;
            }

            if (PrInsertionCompleted != null)
            {
                PrInsertionCompleted();
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            _logger.ErrorException("InsertAsync", ex);

            if (InsertionFailed != null)
            {
                InsertionFailed(Constants.MessageFailed);
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Why not use the Thread Pool? – Peter Ritchie Jul 30 '12 at 15:17
    
A couple of things: 1) Why not use the ThreadPool? 2) The thread state depends on what's going on in those threads (do you have any sleeps or wait handles in those delegates?) 3) It looks like there is a possibility that you never release that lock if _allowNewThreads is false (you should you the lock statement) – SomeWritesReserved Jul 30 '12 at 15:18
    
Without the thread code executing, it's hard to answer this question with much detail. – Peter Ritchie Jul 30 '12 at 15:23
    
I was instructed not to use ThreadPool or any other Thread management method. It sounds odd, but those were my instructions. – Souvlaki Jul 30 '12 at 15:27
    
What's the purpose of storing Threads in a list? – SomeWritesReserved Jul 30 '12 at 16:12
up vote 1 down vote accepted

WaitSleepJoin means the thread has blocked itself with a call to lock (Monitor.Enter), a call to Thread.Sleep, or a call to Thread.Join, or some other thread synchronization object.

Maybe if you provide example thread entry point that is causing this thread state, someone can provide a more detailed answer.

share|improve this answer
    
I can assure you that the thread body is finished with execution. I have debugged through it and everything worked ok (unfortunately I cannot provide detailed code). I saw the last } executing and also the work done by the thread was 100% as expected. The lock was released as well, but the Thread remained in that sleep/wait/join state. – Souvlaki Jul 30 '12 at 15:26
    
Hmmm, I find it hard to believe the system is lying to you... I find it much more likely that the system is correct and that your thread is in fact blocked. Without seeing the code, we can't really tell. – Peter Ritchie Jul 30 '12 at 15:32
    
If I run a quick example of running a thread that simply exits, the state is Stopped and not WaitSleepJoin. – Peter Ritchie Jul 30 '12 at 15:38
    
I have added some extra code. A thread that exits is Stopped. Is it Alive too? – Souvlaki Jul 30 '12 at 15:49
    
@Souvlaki No, a thread can not be Stopped and have IsAlive true – Peter Ritchie Jul 30 '12 at 15:56

You can ask the CLR to automatically abort threads for you when the main startup thread of the program terminates. But that's not automatic, you have to explicitly set the thread's IsBackground property to true. Threadpool threads have that property turned on automatically.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what happens at the moment. Application automatically closes the Threads, but I wonder why this happens? Would it be a nice idea to release the lock before actually starting the Thread? – Souvlaki Jul 30 '12 at 15:31
    
I don't know what you mean. What does releasing a lock when starting a thread have to do with your program terminating? Lock state doesn't matter at all when your process ends. – Hans Passant Jul 30 '12 at 15:36
1  
"Closing a thread" doesn't mean anything, Thread doesn't have a Close() method nor a Dispose() method. Thus hard to know what you are talking about. Document your question better with the stack trace of such a thread. The specific problem in your code is startInfo.IsBackground. That should always be true. – Hans Passant Jul 30 '12 at 15:43
1  
I have a serious problem decoding your comments, "how it is possible" to do what exactly? Why do you fret about ThreadState when your program is terminating? You should seriously consider chucking this code and use ThreadPool. – Hans Passant Jul 30 '12 at 15:54
1  
The Thread class doesn't have a Dispose() method. Which means that the native operating system thread sticks around until the garbage collector runs. GC.Collect() would do it, but calling it just before your program terminates makes no sense. This is btw another issue that the ThreadPool class knows how to deal with. – Hans Passant Jul 30 '12 at 16:07

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