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All,

I need 2 regex expression that will work in .NET to detect whether the user typed in a fraction:

  1. Only fractional values without any whole parts (don't want to check for 1 1/4, 3 1/2, etc.) ONLY: 1/2, 3/4, 8/3, etc. The numerator, denominator can be floating point or integers.

  2. ALL valid fractions such as 1/3, 2/3, 1 1/4, etc.

Thanks.

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#1. \d/{1}\d (I don't know how to do #2) – ActiveX Jul 30 '12 at 15:57
    
Keep in mind, just \d only matches a single digit. To match 0 or more, you use \d*. To match 1 more more, use \d+. In the same logic, you dont need the {1} after the / because its implied that you meant "a single literal slash" – Nick Miceli Jul 30 '12 at 16:05
up vote 0 down vote accepted

For the first

For any fraction in the form of ##/##, where the numerator or denominator could be of any length, you could just use:

\d+(\.\d+)?/\d+(\.\d+)?

Grab as many digits as you can immediately before and after a literal slash, as long as there's at least one or more of those digits. If there's a decimal point, it also must be followed by one or more digits, but that whole group is optional and can only appear once.

For the second

Assuming it must be a fraction, so a whole number alone like 1 would not count, just stick the following on the front

\d*\s*

Grab some digits and whitespace before the rest of the fraction.

share|improve this answer
    
The question asks for "2 regex expression"; the "1 1/4 allowed" example was a requirement for the second regular expression; the "1 1/4 not allowed" example was for the first. – phoog Jul 30 '12 at 15:57
    
For #1 (1st regex), no whole parts, for #2 (2nd regex) I need regex that includes whole parts,- ie. I am looking for 2 different regular expressions. – ActiveX Jul 30 '12 at 15:59
    
Gotcha, gimme a min to edit then – Nick Miceli Jul 30 '12 at 15:59
    
I am not sure I understand you when you say it must be a fraction (in the second regex)? So the example you gave me for 2nd, which checks only for digits followed by spaces, do I add this to the first expr? – ActiveX Jul 30 '12 at 16:05
    
The full regex for the second would be \d*\s*\d+(\.\d+)?/\d+(\.\d+)?. It will allow things like 1/2, 1.2/4, 1/5.67 (because you said they could be floats), and 1 1/2, but it wont allow simply 1, or 10 – Nick Miceli Jul 30 '12 at 16:07

try this:

/// <summary>
/// A regular expression to match fractional expression such as '1 2/3'.
/// It's up to the user to validate that the expression makes sense. In this context, the fractional portion
/// must be less than 1 (e.g., '2 3/2' does not make sense), and the denominator must be non-zero.
/// </summary>
static Regex FractionalNumberPattern = new Regex(@"
    ^                     # anchor the start of the match at the beginning of the string, then...
    (?<integer>-?\d+)     # match the integer portion of the expression, an optionally signed integer, then...
    \s+                   # match one or more whitespace characters, then...
    (?<numerator>\d+)     # match the numerator, an unsigned decimal integer
                          #   consisting of one or more decimal digits), then...
    /                     # match the solidus (fraction separator, vinculum) that separates numerator from denominator
    (?<denominator>\d+)   # match the denominator, an unsigned decimal integer
                          #   consisting of one or more decimal digits), then...
    $                     # anchor the end of the match at the end of the string
    ", RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhitespace
    );

/// <summary>
/// A regular expression to match a fraction (rational number) in its usual format.
/// The user is responsible for checking that the fraction makes sense in the context
/// (e.g., 12/0 is perfectly legal, but has an undefined value)
/// </summary>
static Regex RationalNumberPattern = new Regex(@"
    ^                     # anchor the start of the match at the beginning of the string, then...
    (?<numerator>-?\d+)   # match the numerator, an optionally signed decimal integer
                          #   consisting of an optional minus sign, followed by one or more decimal digits), then...
    /                     # match the solidus (fraction separator, vinculum) that separates numerator from denominator
    (?<denominator>-?\d+) # match the denominator, an optionally signed decimal integer
                          #   consisting of an optional minus sign, followed by one or more decimal digits), then...
    $                     # anchor the end of the match at the end of the string
    " , RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhitespace );
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