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Bear with me, this example may be a bit odd...

Suppose we have a program that returns a character array definition - so we can copy-paste it into some other C# code. One possible result is the following string:

// Current output:
return "CharArray = { {}, {123}, {}, {3 3}, {111}, {}, {}" + "};";

And this suits us just fine.

But now we'd like to eliminate the extra empty lines at the end of CharArray, while leaving any empty lines at the beginning or middle:

// Desired output:
"CharArray = { {}, {123}, {}, {3 3}, {111}" + "};";

(Any empty lines before or between data is necessary for spacing reasons, but empty space at the end serves no purpose to our code.)

Since the final bracket and semicolon aren't added until after the manipulation, it seems the easiest way to do this is to remove all trailing instances of ", {}" from the string. My current solution is a very outside-the-box combination of replaces and trims...

// Red-Green solution:
return output.Replace(", {}", "!").TrimEnd('!').Replace("!", ", {}") + "};";

...which certainly returns the correct result, but is lengthy, confusing to readers, and most likely caused you to cringe when you first read it.

Also, the Regex.Replace I would typically use for this sort of problem only removes one empty line, (because only one exists at the end of the string) and I'd rather not have to feed it through a loop:

// Sub-par solution: (birdie solution?)
 return Regex.Replace(testString, ", {}$", "") + "};";

My question is: How can I best remove all instances of a series of characters from only the end of a string? I'd prefer a result that is both readable and not too slow or taxing on the machine. (As far as the user can currently tell, the return is instantaneous after they press a button.)

Any insight would be appreciated!

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you can use the regex:

return "\n" + Regex.Replace(testString, "(, {})+$", "") + "};";

this will replace also multiple occurences of the searched string

the + operator means: one or multiple occurences of the preceding expression

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Works perfectly! I did some testing with Stopwatch, and it appears to only be slower by a few milliseconds - which is quite acceptable for readability. –  Doc Jul 30 '12 at 16:30
    
Addendum addendum: Further testing shows this solution to be the faster of the two when used once or very few times in a row. In all aspects, this the best solution for my issue. –  Doc Jul 31 '12 at 21:12
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I tried it out, TrimEndMultiple is 20x faster:

    [MethodImplAttribute(MethodImplOptions.NoInlining)] 
    static string TrimEndMutiple(string str, string end)
    {
        int lenend = end.Length;

        int start = str.Length - lenend;

        while (String.CompareOrdinal(str, start, end, 0, lenend) == 0)
        {
            start -= lenend;
        }

        return str.Substring(0, start + lenend);
    } 

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string s = "CharArray = { {}, {123}, {}, {3 3}, {111}, {}, {}";

        Regex reg = new Regex("(, {})+$", RegexOptions.Compiled);

        string s1 = reg.Replace(s, "");
        string s2 = TrimEndMutiple(s, ", {}");

        Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();

        int count = 1000 * 100;

        watch.Start();

        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            s1 = reg.Replace(s, "");
        }

        watch.Stop();

        Console.WriteLine("{0} {1,9:N3} ms", s1, watch.ElapsedTicks * 1000.0 / Stopwatch.Frequency);

        watch.Restart();

        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            s2 = TrimEndMutiple(s, ", {}"); 
        }

        watch.Stop();

        Console.WriteLine("{0} {1,9:N3} ms", s2, watch.ElapsedTicks * 1000.0 / Stopwatch.Frequency);
    }

Result:

CharArray = { {}, {123}, {}, {3 3}, {111}   298.014 ms
CharArray = { {}, {123}, {}, {3 3}, {111}    15.495 ms
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Found the problem with the output: The return statement was incomplete. I'll stick it into your original post, along with some minor spelling fixes. (EDIT: I see you noticed it too.) –  Doc Aug 1 '12 at 18:15
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Try this:

    string TrimEndMultiple(string str, string end)
    {
        int lenend = end.Length;

        int start = str.Length - lenend;

        while (String.CompareOrdinal(str, start, end, 0, lenend) == 0)
        {
            start -= lenend;
        }

        // Addendum:
        return str.Substring(0, start + lenend);
    }
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Your answer will return the correct value, sure, but it suffers from decreased readability and performance. I'd recommend Fix's fix for my problem and similar issues. –  Doc Jul 31 '12 at 20:40
    
It's much more generic solution, and much more efficient (unless you use unsafe code). Just measure it. –  Feng Yuan Jul 31 '12 at 20:44
    
Ah, scratch that - upon closer inspection, it's getting stuck on the while loop. (I just presumed it was taking a long time.) –  Doc Jul 31 '12 at 20:51
1  
Corrected. Fixed? –  Feng Yuan Jul 31 '12 at 22:54
    
Loop works fine now (although your output is the opposite of what I wanted.) Even so, it still appears to be slower than both options, most noticably when repeated, but the difference is barely detectable for one call. –  Doc Aug 1 '12 at 15:23
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