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I’m very new to any kind of .NET web development (thus far I’ve worked primarily with Winforms and services.) I’ve started to work on an existing MVC3 project with two other developers. I’m conceptually familiar with MVC, and am trying to catch up on how it’s used in this project.

We have an AccountDto class to represent Accounts. There is a Response class that is inherited by another class for each Entity, i.e. AccountResponse:

public class Response
{
    [DataMember]
    public bool IsSuccess{get;set;}

    [DataMember]
    public string DisplayMessage { get; set; }

    [DataMember]
    public string DetailedMessage { get; set; }

    [DataMember]
    public ErrorType ErrorType { get; set; }

    public Response(){
        this.IsSuccess=true;
        this.ErrorType = ErrorType.None;
    }
}

public partial class AccountResponse : Response
{
    [DataMember]
    public IList<AccountDto> AccountList { get; set; }
}

There’s an AccountService which will return an AccountResponse to the Controller, with a list of the AccountDto object:

public AccountResponse GetAccountByAccountId(Int64 accountId)
{
    _logger.Info("Executing GetAccountByAccountId()");
    AccountResponse response = new AccountResponse();

    try
    {
        Account item = AccountPersistence.GetAccountByAccountId(accountId);
        AccountDto dto = Mapper.Map<AccountDto>(item);

        response.AccountList = new List<AccountDto>() { dto };
        response.IsSuccess = true;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        response.IsSuccess = false;
        response.ErrorType = ErrorType.GeneralFault;
        response.DetailedMessage = ex.ExceptionMessageBuilder();
        response.DisplayMessage = "System Failure: Failed to get Account by AccountId";
        _logger.Error(ex);
    }
    return response;
}

I was told the Response thing is implemented to be able to handle success/failure messages. So in a controller, there’s code like the following (doesn’t happen to do anything special if a failure):

public ActionResult ToBeCalled(int id)
{
    AccountDto dto = null;
    var response = _accountService.GetAccountByAccountId(Convert.ToInt64(id));
    if (response.IsSuccess)
    {
        dto = response.AccountList[0];
        return View(dto);
    }
    return View(dto);
}

This made sense to me though I wasn’t sure where the success/error messages were going to be utilized. However, they now want to switch from using the DTO in views to using the Response, so success/failure will have to be handled in the views:

public ActionResult ToBeCalled(int id)
{
    var response = _accountService.GetAccountByAccountId(Convert.ToInt64(id));
    return View(response);
}

This seems off to me – instead of coding against a DTO as the model, I have to do something like the following for each page:

@{
    if (Model.IsSuccess)
    {
        var account = Model.AccountList.FirstOrDefault();

        if (account != null)
        {
            @Html.HiddenFor(x => account.AccountNumber)
        }
}

The controllers’ ActionResult / HttpPost methods then have to also parse the DTO from these Response objects. This seems like an anti-pattern to me; are approaches like this normal?

Apologies if this is too lengthy, please migrate if it belongs on Code Review or another site.

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1  
First MVC project I worked on, an almost identical pattern (to a slightly scary degree actually) was in place and I had exactly same thoughts as you. FWIW I agree with @bhamlin below –  glosrob Jul 30 '12 at 17:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I agree with you that this would be an anti-pattern. The View is supposed to be quite ignorant, especially of logic like this.

I can see why this would be tempting, if the difference between success and failure is a minor part of the UI, but imagine if that were to change. A view has little ability (without unnecessary nesting of partials) to switch to an entirely different view. It has no ability to issue a redirect or other error codes. In the event that you decide to change your UI, you may have to go back and rewrite your Controller yet again.

If the reasoning behind moving the logic to the view was to remove the response.IsSuccess logic from the Controller (and to be honest, that seems fine to me; it's pretty much the same as the classic Model.IsValid), you could consider another approach: refactor your Response class to inherit from ActionResult. Then you could move that logic into the ExecuteResult() method and it would be separate from your Controller.

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Just use the coalesce operator and you can get rid of a whole lot of cruft (like that strange Response base class (which should be marked abstract if it continues to exist)) and avoid null-checking.

public ActionResult ToBeCalled(int id)
{
    var response = _accountService.GetAccountByAccountId(id) ??
        new AccountResponse();
    return View(response);
}

Better yet, migrate that logic into your service class so that it guarantees return of an object (it doesn't necessarily make sense for a repository to do this when there's no backing entity, but it does for a service).

Either way, you don't need to include unsightly null-checking or if/else logic on your view. Move as much logic to places that you can test it as you can and you'll be happier.

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