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Given the following code snippet:

try
{
    var myTxt = "";
    var serializer = new DataContractSerializer(myObject.GetType());
    var memoryStream = new MemoryStream()

    serializer.WriteObject(memoryStream, myObject);
    memoryStream.Position = 0;

    using (var reader = new StreamReader(memoryStream))
    {
        myTxt = reader.ReadToEnd();
    }
    .
    .
    .
}
catch (IOException ioEx)
{
     //log or whatever...        
     throw;
}

Typically I'd have a using statement around my memory stream, but from my understanding disposing the StreamReader will close the Memory Stream.

So the question is, is there anything REALLY wrong with the above?

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1  
If WriteObject throws for any reason before the StreamReader gets a chance to wrap it, the MemoryStream will not get disposed. –  vcsjones Jul 30 '12 at 16:15
    
@vcsjones so what would be the implications of not disposing it? Is there actually anything to clean up and the GC will simply clean up for us (eventually)? –  marky Jul 30 '12 at 16:30
1  
You will be at the mercy of the GC to clean it up, so the MemoryStream will occupy memory for longer than it really needs it. That can lead to perf problems, like GC needing to happen more often because of increased memory pressure. –  vcsjones Jul 30 '12 at 16:40
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think its fine because MemoryStream doesn't hold unmanaged resources anyway, but if you wanted to be extra safe you could do this:

var memoryStream = new MemoryStream()
StreamReader reader = null;
try{
    serializer.WriteObject(memoryStream, myObject);

    memoryStream.Position = 0;
    reader = new StreamReader(memoryStream)
    //...
}
finally
{
    if(reader != null)
        reader.Dispose();
    else
        memoryStream.Dispose();
}
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You could simplify your code as I don't see the point of writing, rewinding and reading:

var serializer = new DataContractSerializer(facets.GetType());
using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
{
    serializer.WriteObject(stream, facets);
    string xml = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(stream.ToArray());
}
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It is a good practice to use either

using (var stream = new MemoryStream(...))
using (var reader = new StreamReader(stream))
{
    myTxt = reader.ReadToEnd();
}

Here both stream and reader will be disposed by runtime

or Close() manually both reader(writer) and stream

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the reason he is not doing that is because StreamReader is disposing the underlying stream and when Dispose is called on stream afterwards it will throw an ObjectDisposedException. –  Yaur Jul 30 '12 at 16:22
    
@Yaur Calling Dispose a second time will have no side-affects. This code was flagged by a colleague and although I think it's best practice to dispose of the MemoryStream I'm not so sure its such a huge issue if i dont. –  marky Jul 30 '12 at 16:37
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To test your scenario, I've added

memoryStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);

to the end and received an System.ObjectDisposedException, your code seems valid.

Of course vcsjones's comment is also valid.

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