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Let's say I have a class Base with a single member message (String). Another class BaseHandler which extends this Base class. In this handler I have a method print which is setting a value to the base and printing it. At the end of call to print, I am setting the message to null. When I create 50000 threads and run handler's print method, I get null pointer exception once in a while.

Questions:
Why is null pointer exception thrown when I am explicitly assigning the value?
How would each threads instantiate the Base in this case?
Would the solution be marking Base.message as volatile and removing the null assignment? (in other words how to achieve thread-safety on Base.message

Please take a look at code below:

public class Base {
     public String message;
 }

public class BaseHandler extends Base{

    protected static final Object lock = new Object();

    public void printMessage( ){

        synchronized ( lock ) { //This block is thread safe
            System.out.println( message.toUpperCase( ) );
            message = null;
        }
    }

}

public class Test {   
    public static void main(String[] args){       
        final BaseHandler handler = new BaseHandler();
        for (int i = 0; i < 50000; i++) {
            Runnable task = new Runnable(){
                @Override 
                public void run( ) {
                    handler.message = "Hello world! ";
                    handler.printMessage( );
                }                
            };
            Thread worker = new Thread(task);
            worker.setName(String.valueOf(i));
            worker.start();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Why is null pointer exception thrown when I am explicitly assigning the value?

Imagine the following execution:

  • Thread1: handler.message = "Hello world! ";
  • Thread2: handler.message = "Hello world! ";
  • Thread1: gets the lock, prints and sets message to null
  • thread2: gets the lock, tries to print but message.toUpperCase() throws a NPE.

Your problem is that the 2 lines below are not atomic:

handler.message = "Hello world! ";
handler.printMessage();

Solutions

There are several alternatives, depending on what you are trying to achieve:

  • you could put those 2 lines in a synchronized(lock) block to make the 2 calls atomic
  • you could pass a parameter to the printMessage method: printMessage(message), removing the shared variable issue
  • you could create an instance of the class per call, removing the shared variable issue as well
  • ...
share|improve this answer
    
Do you mean thread-safety at Base.message right? How do I achieve it? –  Mayumi Jul 30 '12 at 16:45
    
I am not sure I understand your question. –  assylias Jul 30 '12 at 16:50
    
Sorry, my question was when setting a value to the Base.message this setter should be locked with the same lock used in the BaseHandler when locking the printMessage correct? –  Mayumi Jul 30 '12 at 16:57
    
@Mayumi No, that would still not be sufficient. You need to have something like synchronized(lock) {handler.message="..."; handler.printMessage();}. In other words you need to hold the lock over the whole block, you can't just lock within each method. –  assylias Jul 30 '12 at 17:00
    
Got it. Thanks! –  Mayumi Jul 30 '12 at 17:13

Here's your problem:

handler.message = "Hello world! ";
handler.printMessage( );

These two operations aren't atomic, only printMessage() is. So this is what happens occasionally:

  1. Thread A modifies message field
  2. Thread B kicks in and modifies it as well
  3. Thread B continue to operate, calling printMessage()
  4. printMessage() in thread B finishes and cleans up message field
  5. Thread A is restored and calls printMessage(). Disaster happens

If you want your code to be thread safe, these two operations need to be atomic. Hard to advice something because there are several other issues in your code: public mutable field, visibility problem, lock is unnecessarily static...

If you can modify this pseudo-code, I would simply pass message as an argument of printMessage() (sound reasonable) and forget about thread-safety and multi-threading. The code would be safe.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree. Will instantiate Base instead of extending it. –  Mayumi Jul 30 '12 at 17:05

You are locking on a read, but you need to lock on when you update the value. Your lock needs to encompass both in order to achieve thread safety: i.e. lock on these.

handler.message = "Hello world! ";
handler.printMessage( );
share|improve this answer

The setting of message, is not thread-safe in your code...

public class MyClass implements Runnable{

BaseHandler handler = new BaseHandler();

public synchronized void go(){

          for (int i = 0; i < 50000; i++) {

                    handler.message = "Hello world! ";
                    handler.printMessage( );
                }                




   }

}

Now Let you Base and BaseHandler as it is... With few changes to Test class

public class Test {   
    public static void main(String[] args){       


            Thread worker = new Thread(MyClass);
            worker.setName(String.valueOf(i));
            worker.start();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

You need to ensure thread-safety both for the read and for the write operations on the shared mutable object. In your case, you are doing an unsafe write. Also, the read and the write need to share the same lock.

public synchronized void setMessage(String msg) {
        this.message = msg;
    }

    public synchronized String getMessage() {
        return message;
    }
}

Note that here I'm implicitly using the object instance as lock. It's a common mistake to use different objects as lock for the same mutable object.

Then, your BaseHandler class will look something like this:

public class BaseHandler extends Base {

    public synchronized void printMessage( ) {
        if (getMessage()!=null) {
            System.out.println( getMessage().toUpperCase( ) );
            setMessage(null);
        }
    }
}

These two methods makes your Base-BaseHandler class hierarchy thread-safe to any client. That means that clients using your object do not need to use synchronization.

share|improve this answer
    
That does not solve the issue. The call to your setMessage method and the printMessage method will still need to be atomic to avoid the NPE. –  assylias Jul 30 '12 at 16:58
    
@assylias Yes, exactly what I'm saying. –  maasg Jul 30 '12 at 17:06
    
What I understand from your post is: make sure you use a lock in both the setMessage and printMessage methods and make sure you use the same lock in both. I am saying this is not enough. But I might have misunderstood your point. –  assylias Jul 30 '12 at 17:08
    
@assylias I see you have a point. But your proposal does not make BaseHandler thread safe, it only "deals" with BaseHandler being unsafe. The right approach would be to check if (message!=null) before the operation. –  maasg Jul 30 '12 at 17:23
1  
@assylias in light of learning thread-safety, the difference between locking the accessors and making the two operations an atomic block is that of concurrency. Enclosing the two operations in an atomic block effectively serializes execution, so it would be better to have it running in 1 thread as there's no parallelization possible. Making the object calls thread-safe increases parallelism, but introduces potential data loss. This is of course due to the contrieved nature of the example. –  maasg Jul 30 '12 at 17:45

You are using fragile extension and shared mutable state to achieve what would be much simpler if you just passed the state around on the stack as parameters. Make printMessage take the message as a parameter and you solve all these problems.

public void printMessage(final String message){
    System.out.println( message.toUpperCase( ) );
}

Now you only need to deal with the case where you were actually passed a null.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the comment. That's exactly what I ended up doing. No idea why I extended the class that holds args.... –  Mayumi Jul 31 '12 at 1:17

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