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Im trying to use a lambdas as a static member, like this:

struct A
{
    static constexpr auto F = [](){};
};


int main()
{
    A::F();
    return 0;
}

Is this even correct C++11 code? On clang, I get this error:

error: constexpr variable 'F' must be initialized by a constant
      expression
    static constexpr auto F = [](){};
                              ^~~~~~

It seems in clang, lambdas aren't considered a constant expression. Is this correct? Perhaps they haven't fully implemented lamdas yet in clang because gcc 4.7 seems to allow it as a constexpr, but it give another error:

error: ‘constexpr const<lambda()> A::F’, declared using local type ‘const<lambda()>’, is used but never defined

Im not sure, I understand what that means. It seems to correctly deduce the type of the lambda, but it only declares it and not define it. How would I go about defining it?

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10  
Can I be super unhelpful and ask, uh, "Why on earth would you want to do this?" What would this construction do that a normal member function would not? –  Rook Jul 30 '12 at 16:57
    
@Rook Save him to write the return type and we can throw the static constexpr auto noise into a macro. –  pmr Jul 30 '12 at 17:02
    
Because type deduction is much better with lambdas than member functions. –  Paul Jul 30 '12 at 17:02
3  
@Paul: so is the actual issue here that you're working with functions that have particularly crazy and unwieldy return types? –  Rook Jul 30 '12 at 17:06
1  
@Paul: ahh, that makes a lot more sense now. It looks to me a lot like you are operating at the bleeding edge of C++, so you might have to wait for compilers to catch up with you. I note VC++ 2012 can't even manage constexpr yet, either. What you're doing doesn't look like it contravenes the standard, but I may well be misreading things. –  Rook Jul 30 '12 at 17:41
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2 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This code is ill-formed. A constexpr variable is required to be initialized by a constant expression, and [expr.const]p2 says:

A conditional-expression is a core constant expression unless it involves one of the following as a potentially evaluated subexpression [...]:

  • a lambda-expression

GCC is therefore incorrect to accept this code.

Here's one way to give a class a static data member of lambda type:

auto a = []{};
struct S {
  static decltype(a) b;
};
decltype(a) S::b = a;
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GCC is therefore incorrect to accept this code. I think it's not that simple. Is diagnostic/error required for this case? There are many ill-formated programs that give no compiler error/warning (and for good reason) –  Johan Lundberg Jul 31 '12 at 10:32
    
Constexpr aside, is there no possible way to create a lambda as a static member to a class in C++11? –  Paul Jul 31 '12 at 19:19
2  
@LucDanton Constant expressions are defined in terms of core constant expressions, so p2 is relevant. See p3. The different of "constant expression" and "core constant expression" is not "syntax" vs "semantics" but, as far as I can remember, "actual compile-time known value or reference" vs "intermediate result in computing a constant expression". So, the address of a non-static local variable is a valid core constant expression. But as that address's value is not really known at compile time, it is not an address constant expression. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 2 '12 at 20:19
1  
@JohanLundberg Yes, a diagnostic is required for every rule, including this one, unless otherwise stated. See [intro.compliance]p2. –  Richard Smith Aug 3 '12 at 21:25
2  
@Paul I think you're out of luck. There are some tricks to get the lambda expression inside the template and extract its type, such as template<typename T> std::remove_reference<T>::type *addr(T &&t) { return &t; } struct S { constexpr static auto *p = false ? addr([]{}) : nullptr; static decltype(*p) lambda; };, but even then it's not possible to provide an initializer for S::lambda. –  Richard Smith Aug 6 '12 at 4:30
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You can make it work, in clang 3.4, as long as the lambda doesn't capture anything. The idea is directly from Pythy .

#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>
template<typename T>
auto address(T&& t) -> typename std:: remove_reference<T> :: type *
{
        return &t;
}

struct A
{
        static constexpr auto * F = false ? address(

                [](int x){ std:: cout << "It worked. x = " << x << std:: endl;

                }
        ) : nullptr; // a nullptr, but at least its *type* is useful
};


int main()
{
    (*A::F)(1337); // dereferencing a null. Doesn't look good
    return 0;
}

There are two potentially controversial bits here. First, there's the fact that A::F is constexpr, but it has a lambda in its definition.

That should be impossible right? No. A ternary expression b ? v1 : v2 can be a constexpr without requiring all three of b, v1, v2 to be constexpr. It is sufficient merely that b is constexpr along with one of the remaining two (depending on whether b is true or false. Here b is false, and this selects the final part of the ?:, i.e. nullptr.

In other words false ? a_non_constexpr_func() : a_constexpr_func() is a constexpr. This appears to be the interpretation in clang anyway. I hope this is what's in the standard. If not, I wouldn't say that clang "should not accept this". It appears to be a valid relaxation of the rule. The unevaluated part of a ?: is unevaluated and therefore it constexpr-ness shouldn't matter.

Anyway, assuming this is OK, that gives us a nullptr of the correct type, i.e. the type of a pointer to the lambda. The second controversial bit is (*A::F)(1337); where we are dereferencing the null pointer. But it is argued by the page linked above that that is not a problem:

It appears that we are derefencing a null pointer. Remember in C++ when dereferencing a null pointer, undefined behavior occurs when there is an lvalue-to-rvalue conversion. However, since a non-capturing lambda closure is almost always implemented as an object with no members, undefined behavior never occurs, since it won't access any of its members. Its highly unlikely that a non-capturing lambda closure could be implemented another way since it must be convertible to a function pointer. But the library does statically assert that the closure object is empty to avoid any possible undefined behavior.

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That page is missing the point on Undefined Behavior. It happens when you dereference a null pointer. Now the Undefined Behavior may not be noticeable , for instance because the lambda has no members, but that's an implementation detail. It's UB because the standard says so. –  MSalters Feb 27 at 19:24
1  
@MSalters That is an oversimplification. The standard doesn't say that (*(E1)).E2 is undefined behaviour when it is null. I believe undefined behaviour only occurs when there is an lvalue-to-rvalue conversion. So &*(p=0) is not undefined behavior. See here for a discussion. –  Paul Feb 28 at 2:23
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