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Hopefully I've explained it well enough in the title but here is what I have:

Input data:

Mushroom Kingdom, Mario

Hyrule, Link

Mushroom Kingdom, Bowser

Zebes, Samus

Zebes, Metroid

And I want to run something like this,

# The next three lines establish that I'll be reading proc as a file
import subprocess
cmd = 'external command that returns the above data'
proc = subprocess.Popen(cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)

homeworlds = {}

while True:
  line = proc.stdout.readline().split(',')
  if line:
    # If line isn't empty
    homeword = line[0]
    person = line[1]

    homeworlds[homeword] = list.append[person] # Good logic? Bad syntax?

  else:
   break

The goal is that I'll be able to call:

print homeworlds['Mushroom Kingdom']

and return the list

Mario, Bowser
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted
 if not homeword in homeworlds:
    homeworlds[homeword] = list()
 homeworlds[homeword].append(person)
share|improve this answer
    
homeworlds.append(person) -> homeworlds[homeword].append(person) – Zuljin Jul 30 '12 at 16:50
    
Better solution is using collections.defaultdict() – Andreas Jung Jul 30 '12 at 16:53
    
Could someone elaborate as to why defaultdict is a better option here? – PopeJohnPaulII Jul 31 '12 at 15:24

It's easier to use a defaultdict here. Also, you're curretnly calling split() without any parameters. What you really want to do is split on the ,. So you should call split(',').

So your code should look somewhat like this:

homeworlds = collections.defaultdict(list)
while True:
  line = proc.stdout.readline().split(',')
  if line:
    # If line isn't empty
    homeworld = line[0].strip()
    person = line[1].strip()

    homeworlds[homeworld].append(person)

  else:
    break
share|improve this answer
1  
You might want homeworld = line[0].strip() (etc.) since splitting on ',' will leave whitespace on the ends of the string. – mgilson Jul 30 '12 at 16:54
    
You are absolutely right! Upgrading answer now – inspectorG4dget Jul 30 '12 at 17:27
    
Could you explain why defaultdict is the best choice? – PopeJohnPaulII Jul 31 '12 at 15:27
    
It's lighter to program with. You don't have to check for the presence of a key. If the key does not exist in the dictionary, it will create the key as well as (in this case) an empty list as the value of that key. So you don't have to do if myKey in myDict: myDict[myKey].append(...); else: myDict[myKey] = [...]. Rather you can do myDict[myKey].append(...) directly, even if myKey is not in myDict – inspectorG4dget Jul 31 '12 at 18:03

Use defaultdict

from collections import defaultdict
homeworlds = defaultdict(list)

homeworlds[homeword].append(person)
share|improve this answer

Try this:

if homeword not in homeworlds:
    homeworlds[homeword] = []
homeworlds[homeword].append(person)

This checks to see if there's an entry for homeword in homeworld. If there's not, it adds a list there. Then we know for sure that we have a list at homeworld[homeword] so we can just call .append(person) on it.

share|improve this answer
Python 2.7.3rc2 (default, Apr 22 2012, 22:30:17) 
[GCC 4.6.3] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> input_data = [('Mushroom Kingdom', 'Mario'),
...  ('Hyrule', 'Link'),
...  ('Mushroom Kingdom', 'Bowser'),
...  ('Zebes', 'Samus'),
...  ('Zebes', 'Metroid')]
>>> homeworlds = {}
>>> for homeword,person in input_data:
...   homeworlds.setdefault(homeword, []).append(person)
... 
>>> homeworlds
{'Hyrule': ['Link'], 'Zebes': ['Samus', 'Metroid'], 'Mushroom Kingdom': ['Mario', 'Bowser']}
>>> print(homeworlds['Mushroom Kingdom'])
['Mario', 'Bowser']
>>> print("{0}".format(', '.join(homeworlds['Mushroom Kingdom'])))
Mario, Bowser

in your case swap in for loop: 'input_data' for 'line'

share|improve this answer

Here is a consistant and elegant solutions (partially inspired from other answers) :

#!/bin/env python
from collections import defaultdict

lines = """Mushroom Kingdom, Mario

Hyrule, Link

Mushroom Kingdom, Bowser

Zebes, Samus

Zebes, Metroid
"""

homeworlds = defaultdict(list)

for line in lines.splitlines():
    if line and ',' in line:
        key, value = line.split(',')
        homeworlds[key].append(value.trim())

print(homeworlds)
share|improve this answer
    
Note that line.split(', ') will split on every occurence of the string ', ', so this probably isn't quite what you want. – Sam Mussmann Jul 30 '12 at 17:06
    
Exact. I modified the code to take this remark into account. – Alexis Huet Jul 31 '12 at 8:41

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