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SQL Server: how do I make a trigger that only affects the row that was updated/inserted?

  Table User
  Userid(number)
  is_updated(char)

  Table Version
  Version_number(number)
  userid(number)

Now if I insert/update values in version table, I want to update the is_updated column using a triger but how do I fetch the userid of the updated/inserted row for that?

This is first time with triggers can somebody help me

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marked as duplicate by LittleBobbyTables, Alex K, prolink007, casperOne Jul 31 '12 at 19:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
Can you specify which Database mySQL, SQL Server, Oracle? –  Vikram Jul 30 '12 at 17:45
    
ANd if you are using SQL Server, don;t forget to write teh trigger to handle mulitple row inserts. BUT @vikram is correct, we cannot help uyou until you tell us what database as trigger code is very differnt depending on the database. –  HLGEM Jul 30 '12 at 18:01

1 Answer 1

You should probably check books online's documentation on the CREATE TRIGGER statement before posting a question like this. A trigger is nothing more than a special stored procedure that inherits two special virtual tables, inserted and deleted. So try something like this:

create trigger dbo.version_TR01
on             dbo.version
for insert, update
as
begin

  --
  -- make sure everybody has a row in the user table
  --
  insert dbo.[user]( user_id , is_updated )
  select i.user_id , 'F'
  from inserted i
  where not exists ( select *
                     from dbo.[user] u
                     where u.user_id = i.user_id
                   )

  --
  -- mark everybody as updated
  --
  update dbo.[user]
  set is_updated = 'T'
  from dbo.[user] u
  join inserted   i on i.user_id = u.user_id

end

That should about do it.

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