Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is an condensed example of what I am trying to do:

class Entity(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=70)

class Individual(models.Model):
    first_name = models.CharField(max_length=30)
    last_name = models.CharField(max_length=30)

class BookingAgent(Entity)
    staff = models.ManyToManyField(Individual, through='Role', related_name="employee")

class Role(models.Model):
    person = models.ForeignKey(Individual)
    company = models.ForeignKey(Entity)
    position = models.CharField(max_length=70)

Basically, I have a parent class called Entity that stores all of the basic information for a company i.e. address, etc. I then have a BookingAgent that is the child of the Entity. When I try to create a through relationship on the BookingAgent model it doesn't work. I get the error:

'staff' is a manually-defined m2m relation through model Role, which does not have foreign keys to Individual and BookingAgent

But it works when the through relationship is defined in the Entity` model.

My goal is to have each Entity have a list of individuals that are employees or members. I think I understand why it is not working but I can't figure out an elegant solution.

Thanks!

UPDATE: To clarify, Entity isn't an abstract base class because there will be some Entities that are not BookingAgents, ManagementCompanies, etc

share|improve this question
    
Technically, there's nothing wrong with what you have. If BookingAgent is-a Entity then you should be able to save it to any ForeignKey that accepts Entity. However, with the way Django sets up the M2M API, this won't work. In order for the API to function properly, it must attach related managers to both sides of the relationship, i.e. Individual and BookingAgent but your code will rather cause related managers to be added to Individual and Entity. You might call this a bug, but I would imagine the Django devs would mark it WONTFIX if you submitted it. –  Chris Pratt Jul 30 '12 at 18:50
    
Thanks @ChrisPratt! I looked up Managers but I am still confused as to how I can solve this. Could you clarify? –  Nahanaeli Schelling Jul 30 '12 at 19:29
    
The point is that I don't think you can solve this. You'll need to use a different "through" model for each specific relationship. –  Chris Pratt Jul 30 '12 at 19:47
add comment

1 Answer

I think you need to change "RoleTest" to "Role" and you need to have a foreign key to BookingAgent, not Entity (and shouldn't Entity be an abstract base class?)

class BookingAgent(Entity)
    staff = models.ManyToManyField(Individual, through='Role', related_name="employee")

class Role(models.Model):
    person = models.ForeignKey(Individual)
    company = models.ForeignKey(BookingAgent)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! The "RoleTest" typo was only in my question here. I can't have the foregin key be to 'BookingAgent' because I also have 'ManagementCompany' etc. Or should I make a seperate 'Role' model for each one? –  Nahanaeli Schelling Jul 30 '12 at 18:00
    
ouch. this is not so straightforward. You could make a seperate through table for each subclass of Entity. Alternatively you could merge all the subclasses of Entity and give it a type field that would be one of 'Booking Agent', 'Managment company' etc. Or you could use Django's content types to have a generic relationship from Role to whatever model. Probably none of these is ideal. –  scytale Jul 30 '12 at 20:24
    
Thanks for the feedback. Some of my subclasses have different fields so instead of merging them into 'Entity' I'm going to take the Generic Relationship route. This tutorial helped: link –  Nahanaeli Schelling Jul 31 '12 at 14:45
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.