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Looks a newbie question, but this function is called many times, to be honest thousands of time per-second, so an optimization is CRUCIAL in here. What would be the best method?

struct CHOLDELEM
{
    DWORD dwColor[3], dwItemId[3];
    int nPos[3], nLength[3];
    CItemElem* pItem[3];
    CHOLDELEM()
    {
        for( int i=0; i<=3; i++ )
        {
            dwColor[i] = dwItemId[i] = 0;
            nPos[i] = nLength[i] = 0;
            pItem[i] = NULL;
        }
    }
};

or with memsets?

memset( dwColor, 0, sizeof( dwColor ) );

or another method.

share|improve this question
    
ooks a newbie question, but this function is called many times, to be honest thousands of time per-second, so an optimization is CRUCIAL in here. What would be the best method? -- I strongly doubt this. Being called often != should optimize - please profile to demonstrate that this strip of code is actually slowing your program down. –  djechlin Jul 30 '12 at 17:50
4  
The only thing that can tell you the answer for sure is your profiler. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 30 '12 at 17:50
1  
Anything wrong with memset? –  Rook Jul 30 '12 at 17:51
7  
You could speed it up slightly by not writing beyond the end of each array. –  Mike Seymour Jul 30 '12 at 17:52
3  
DWORD dwColor[3]; declares an array with 3 valid indexes, namely 0, 1 and 2. There is no index 3. Trying to access dwColor[3] is forbidden by the language; it yields undefined behavior (read: anything could happen). Thus, your loop condition should be i < 3, not i <= 3. –  FredOverflow Jul 30 '12 at 18:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As long as you are interested in zero initialization only, you can simply do

CHOLDELEM() : dwColor(), dwItemId(), nPos(), nLength(), pItem()
  {}

(no C++11 necessary).

However, you might want to take a look at the code your compiler generates for it. If it is not optimal somehow, then a better idea might be to keep your struct a POD (no constructor) and initialize it "from outside" when you declare objects of that type

CHOLDELEM c = {};
share|improve this answer

If your compiler can handle C++11 initializers, then you can set the array values in the constructor initializer list:

CHOLDELEM() :
    dwColor{0}, dwItemId{0}, nPos{0}, nLength{0}, pItem{nullptr}
    { }

Then the compiler will generate (pretty optimal) code to handle that.

share|improve this answer

I would probably use the memset approach, but I would definitely want to make sure that it doesn't break when more complex data members are added to CHOLDELEM:

#include <type_traits>

// ...

    CHOLDELEM()
    {
        static_assert(std::is_trivially_copyable<CHOLDELEM>::value,
                      "It is no longer safe to use memset!");
        memset(this, 0, sizeof *this);
    }

By the way, CHOLDELEM is a terrible name. Why don't you rename it to ElementHolder or something?

share|improve this answer
    
all structs god knows why start with a C and caps lock on this source, I'm just following... –  Viniyo Shouta Jul 30 '12 at 18:08
    
What do you mean "all structs"? All structs your teacher uses? –  FredOverflow Jul 30 '12 at 18:08

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