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Is there a way for me to catch all incoming requests to my ASP.NET MVC 4 app and run some code before continuing the request onward to the specified controller/action?

I need to run some custom auth code with existing services, and to do this properly, I'll need to be able intercept all incoming requests from all clients to double check some things with the other service.

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4  
See my filtering article msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg416513(VS.98).aspx –  RickAnd - MSFT Jul 30 '12 at 19:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 27 down vote accepted

The most correct way would be to create a class that inherits ActionFilterAttribute and override OnActionExecuting method. This can then be registered in the GlobalFilters in Global.asax.cs

Of course, this will only intercept requests that actually have a route.

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2  
The only (ugly) otherway is the protected void Application_BeginRequest(object sender, EventArgs e). –  Erik Philips Jul 30 '12 at 17:55
1  
Well, I guess you could also create a HttpHandler and register that to catch all in web.config, but that's really dirty :) –  Yngve B. Nilsen Jul 30 '12 at 17:56
    
Great, thanks! Will mark as answer when enough time has passed. –  Jesse Jul 30 '12 at 17:58
1  
Yeah, you can set the filterContext.Result to a RedirectResult –  Yngve B. Nilsen Jul 30 '12 at 19:21
1  
You can change the result to whatever type of ActionResult you see fit –  Yngve B. Nilsen Jul 30 '12 at 19:23

You can use a HttpModule to accomplish this. Here is a sample I use to calculate the process time for all requests:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Web;

namespace Sample.HttpModules
{
    public class PerformanceMonitorModule : IHttpModule
    {

        public void Init(HttpApplication httpApp)
        {
            httpApp.BeginRequest += OnBeginRequest;
            httpApp.EndRequest += OnEndRequest;
            httpApp.PreSendRequestHeaders += OnHeaderSent;
        }

        public void OnHeaderSent(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            var httpApp = (HttpApplication)sender;
            httpApp.Context.Items["HeadersSent"] = true;
        }

        // Record the time of the begin request event.
        public void OnBeginRequest(Object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            var httpApp = (HttpApplication)sender;
            if (httpApp.Request.Path.StartsWith("/media/")) return;
            var timer = new Stopwatch();
            httpApp.Context.Items["Timer"] = timer;
            httpApp.Context.Items["HeadersSent"] = false;
            timer.Start();
        }

        public void OnEndRequest(Object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            var httpApp = (HttpApplication)sender;
            if (httpApp.Request.Path.StartsWith("/media/")) return;
            var timer = (Stopwatch)httpApp.Context.Items["Timer"];

            if (timer != null)
            {
                timer.Stop();
                if (!(bool)httpApp.Context.Items["HeadersSent"])
                {
                    httpApp.Context.Response.AppendHeader("ProcessTime",
                                                          ((double)timer.ElapsedTicks / Stopwatch.Frequency) * 1000 +
                                                          " ms.");
                }
            }

            httpApp.Context.Items.Remove("Timer");
            httpApp.Context.Items.Remove("HeadersSent");

        }

        public void Dispose() { /* Not needed */ }
    }

}

And this is how you register the module in Web.Config:

<system.webServer>
    <modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true">
        <add name="PerformanceMonitorModule" type="Sample.HttpModules.PerformanceMonitorModule" />
    </modules>
<//system.webServer>
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If the goal is to capture MVC app requests before they go to the controller, filtering is a much better approach. See my article msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg416513(VS.98).aspx - my sample has a nice timing filter –  RickAnd - MSFT Jul 30 '12 at 19:51
    
Thank you, I'll check –  Mennan Kara Jul 30 '12 at 19:54

I think that what you search for is this:

Application_BeginRequest()

http://www.dotnetcurry.com/showarticle.aspx?ID=126

You put it in Global.asax.cs.

    protected void Application_BeginRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        HttpContext.Current.Request.....;
    }

I use this for debugging purposes but I am not sure how good solution it is for your case.

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Not an answer but an observation and not enough rep to comment.

There is a caveat that isn't addressed (though Yngve points out) but could be important in deciding which approach you accept for your project.

An Action Filter (from Yngve's answer) is ideal if you're only interested in requests that map to controllers (and therefore, the custom code is only relevant in your MVC solution and not in the greater web solution/presence). However, to address ALL requests, an HTTP Module would be best (as Mennan answered) as it would ensure that the custom code will intercept the requests even if the clients are not calling into a controller; for instance, you created a custom HTTP handler in your MVC application (or any IIS-hosted application) and you need some custom authorization logic to run before the handler...that's where the HTTP module would come in.

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