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I have a Controller that I am using to pass a list of JSON data to my view. Currently I'm using Linq to Entities to populate the Viewmodel now but since it is a static list of only 15 pairs, I want to hard code the Viewmodel but I'm not sure how to do that. Here is my Controller

public JsonResult GetSites()
    {
        var sites = context.vAaiomsSites.Select(s => new vAaiomsSitesVM
        {
            ID = s.ID,
            SiteName = s.SiteName
        }).OrderBy(s => s.SiteName);

        return Json(sites, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
    }

I just need an array like this:

SiteID: 1, SiteName : Barter Island

SiteID: 2, SiteName: Cape Lisburne

....12 more times.

share|improve this question
    
what does your viewmodel look like? Is it taking a list of SiteId's or are there x number of site id's declared? –  Brian Jul 30 '12 at 18:44
    
Any particular reason for wanting to hard code this? Why not just cache it after you have read it out first time? –  SteenT Jul 30 '12 at 18:47

2 Answers 2

Use collection initializer to create an array (or List<T>) of the ViewModels:

public JsonResult GetSites()
{
    var sitesArray = new vAaiomsSitesVM[]
        {
            new vAaiomsSitesVM
            {
                ID = 1,
                SiteName = "Barter Island"
            },

            new vAaiomsSitesVM
            {
                ID = 2,
                SiteName = "Cape Lisburne"
            }

            // And so on...
        };

    var sites = sitesArray.OrderBy(s => s.SiteName);
    return Json(sites, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
}
share|improve this answer

If you really want to hardcode it, you can do it like this.

Create a class for your ViewModel

public class Site
{
  public int SiteID { set;get;}
  public string SiteName { set;get;}
}

and in your Action method

public JsonResult GetSites()
{
   var list=new List<Site>();
   list.Add(new Site{ SiteID=1, SiteName="SiteName 1" } );
   list.Add(new Site{ SiteID=2, SiteName="SiteName 2" } );
   //13 more times !!!!
  return Json(list, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);  
}

But Why do you want to HardCode it ? I recommend you to avoid this if at possible.If you are worried about querying your database everytime, you may think about storing the data in a middle Caching Layer and fetch it from there thus avoiding call to database. Think twice.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the code and advice. I wanted to hard code it because my users are at remote sites with satellite provided internet which is terribly slow. I use the list of sites as filters in a dropdown and was seeing a bit of latency on the page load so I thought that since there are only 15 sites and they never change, I would see a performance benefit. I would like to explore the caching option, that sounds interesting. –  Alan Fisher Jul 30 '12 at 21:23
    
@AlanFisher: Caching will reduce some network traffic and brings speed. Good luck –  Shyju Jul 30 '12 at 21:30
    
@AlanFisher - This won't really benefit them since your server is still sending the same amount of data, and that is the real bottleneck in this instance. Consider compression techniques instead (minifying JS/CSS files, using Gzip compression in IIS) –  Andrew Burgess Jul 31 '12 at 2:14

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