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For each distinct Name, I want to select the first three rows with the earliest time_stamp (or smallest number in UNIXTIME). What is the correct query?

Start Table:

Name         Log-in Time
--------     -----------------
Don          05:30:00
Don          05:35:32
Don          07:12:43
Don          09:52:23
Don          05:32:43
James        03:30:00
James        03:54:23
James        09:51:54
James        14:43:34
James        43:22:11
James        59:43:33
James        20:12:11
Mindy        05:32:22
Mindy        15:14:44
Caroline     10:02:22
Rebecca      20:43:32

End Table:

Name         Log-in Time
--------     -----------------
Don          05:30:00
Don          05:35:32
Don          07:12:43
James        03:30:00
James        03:54:23
James        09:51:54
Mindy        05:32:22
Mindy        15:14:44
Caroline     10:02:22
Rebecca      20:43:32
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2  
what RDBMS are you using? –  bluefeet Jul 30 '12 at 18:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
WITH Table (Name, LoginTime, Row) AS
(
    SELECT 
       Name,
       LoginTime,
       ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Name ORDER BY LoginTime)
    FROM SomeTable
)
SELECT 
   Name,
   LoginTime
FROM Table
WHERE 
   Row <= 3
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This works in sql2008. SELECT Name, LoginTime FROM (SELECT Name, LoginTime, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Name ORDER BY LoginTime) AS Row FROM SomeTable ) AS A WHERE Row <= 3 –  Muthukumar Jul 30 '12 at 19:10
1  
It will also work in PostGres and, based on a quick google, it seems Oracle also supports CTE and the Row_Number() function. EDIT: sufficiently recent versions of Postgres and Oracle, I should say. –  Aushin Jul 30 '12 at 19:17
2  
@Muthukumar: actually, CTE's were introduced in SQL Server 2005 - but they're available in other RDBMS as well (it's not a Microsoft specific extension, but rather part of the most recent ANSI/ISO SQL standard) –  marc_s Jul 30 '12 at 19:20
    
@marc_s thank you that's what I was trying to convey, I forgot what to call "the generally-agreed-upon set of sql commands" lol –  Aushin Jul 30 '12 at 19:24
    
@marc_s Thanks Guys. It was informative.. –  Muthukumar Jul 30 '12 at 19:43

An ansi standard approach actually looks to work with the following:

http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/b814d/15

SELECT
    NAME
    , LOGIN
FROM (
    SELECT 
        test_first.NAME,
        test_first.LOGIN,
        COUNT(*) CNT
    FROM 
        TABLE_NAME test_first
    LEFT OUTER JOIN 
        TABLE_NAME test_second
        ON (test_first.NAME = test_second.NAME)
    WHERE 
        test_first.LOGIN <= test_second.LOGIN
    GROUP BY  
        test_first.NAME, test_first.LOGIN) test_order
WHERE 
    test_order.CNT <= 3
ORDER BY 
    NAME ASC, LOGIN ASC
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