Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to have a comments section in my app that looks like this:

response1
 response1a
 response1b
  response1b1
response2
 response2a
 response2b
 response2c
  response2c1
   response2c1a
    response2c1a1
     response2c1a1
      response2c1a1a
       response2c1a1a1

I believe it's called threaded comments. You've probably seen this format on many online discussion sites such as reddit.

What I'm wondering is how to implement this in the HTML of my app?

What type of html/css combination would make the most sense to allow this type of application-determined indenting?

share|improve this question
    
You don't specify if the comments themselves will be just plain text or more complicated. That distinction might change the answers. –  Runscope API Tools Jul 23 '09 at 16:21
    
@John - Under what circumstances would you allow users to enter non-text-based comments? Not sure I understand. –  J. Holmes Jul 23 '09 at 16:23
    
code examples, images maybe. Although it really shouldn't change the structure of the responses. Anything the user entered as a response would get enclosed in whatever tag was containing the response. Ideally, the tag would be a block-level item. –  davethegr8 Jul 23 '09 at 16:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In your HTML:

<div class="comment">
  Response1
  <div class="comment">
    Response1a
    <div class="comment">
      Response1a1
    </div>
  </div>
  <div class="comment">
    Response1b
  </div>
</div>

And in your CSS:

.comment { margin-left: 50px; }

This approach is very flexible and portable. You could also use <ul>/<li> instead of <div> (I guess it's possible to argue both in favour and against seeing threaded comments as semantically equivalent to unordered lists). The inner comment can also be wrapped in another <div> if you require it for additionaly CSS styling.


Update: I (slightly) prefer <div>s over <ul>/<li> because it simplifies your implementation.

Firstly, if you go with the list-based approach, you have to strip the default <li> style that most browsers use (a bullet point and padding). Secondly, you will probably also want to target the set of <ul>/<li>s that are specific to your threaded comments, because they should look different from other list structures. This means that even with the "semantic" approach, you have resort to classes. So in the end, what advantage do you really get, and is it worth the extra hassle?

We've been a little more careful with applying <ul> structures like this in our projects, and so far we're really happy about it. And apparently we're not the only one.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi molf. Why do you say this very flexible and portable? Do you believe it's more flexible and portable than the <ul>/<li> approach which most people seem to be recommending? You're the only person who has recommended a <div>/css approach so I'm curious what your reasoning is. –  J. Holmes Jul 23 '09 at 16:42
    
@J Holmes: I added an update to my answer, hopefully this clarifies your question about the slight preference that I expressed. –  molf Jul 23 '09 at 17:11
    
Thanks for explaining. –  J. Holmes Jul 23 '09 at 17:23

The most used structure is a combination of <ul>s (unordered list) and <li>s (list item). Each post would have a list of comments, for example:

<div id="post">
    ... (post content here) ...

    <ul class="responses">
        <li>response1</li>
        <li>response2</li>
    </ul>
</div>

Then, expanding that idea, each response may have a list of responses as well. These go inside the <li> item.

<div id="post">
    ... (post content here) ...

    <ul class="responses">
        <li>
            response1
            <ul class="responses">
                <li>response1a</li>
                <li>response1b</li>
            </ul>
        </li>
        <li>response2</li>
    </ul>
</div>

This approach is fairly lightweight code-wise, and is semantically (the tags used mean the right thing) most appropriate.

To add some css onto that to make it visually appealing, you can do something like this:

ul.responses {
    padding-left: 4em;
}

ul.responses li {
    border-width: 2px 0;
    border-style: solid;
    border-color: #ccc;
}

This indents each response list, and adds a small border onto the top and bottom of each response, effectively showing the user that this response contains another list of responses to this response.

share|improve this answer

Wouldn't embedded lists work? Embedded un-ordered lists with list-style-type turned off would do that effect. Maybe I'm not understanding your question.

ie.

<ul>
<li>response1
 <ul>
 <li>response1a</li>
 <li>response1b
  <ul>
   <li>response1b1</li>
  </ul>
 </li>
</li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
Yup, that's a list of comments. So use lists. –  edeverett Jul 23 '09 at 16:18
    
Most semantic way indeed –  Gab Royer Jul 23 '09 at 16:20
    
Using UL/LI can be a pain if your comment themselves can contain HTML lists. You'll need extra markup to distinguish between the structure lists and the content lists. –  Runscope API Tools Jul 23 '09 at 16:20
    
Yeah, that's a good point. My way is just the basic approach. –  Vian Esterhuizen Jul 23 '09 at 16:22
    
You just have to make separate classes then –  Gab Royer Jul 23 '09 at 16:22

<ul> and <li> tags

Example:

<html>
<head>

</head>
<body>
    <ul>
    	<li>
    		comment
    		<ul>
    			<li>I comment you
    				<ul>
    					<li>oh, and I comment you!</li>
    				</ul>
    			</li>
    		</ul>
    	</li>
    	<li>
    		another one
    		<ul>
    			<li>comment about your</li>
    			<li>well, another about you</li>
    		</ul>
    	</li>
    </ul>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Upvoted for semantic and code –  Gab Royer Jul 23 '09 at 16:20

I hacked something like that together for ManagedAssembly.com. It's not perfect, but it might give you some ideas.

share|improve this answer

What you have is a series of nested lists with a given order so a series of nested <OL> elements would make most sense. You have give OL a left margin so that each level of nesting appears more indented than its parent.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.