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I have a JAR file that I'm using and I want to modify one of the files inside it. In a nutshell I have

public class ClassB {
    public void printMethod(){
       ClassA A = new ClassA();
       A.printout();
    }   
}

public class ClassA {
  public void printout(){
    System.out.println("1234");
  }
}

and I want to change ClassA's printout method to

public class ClassA {
  public void printout(){
    System.out.println("abcd");
  }
}

I know you cannot modify a JAR without unpacking/rebuilding it and for this, let's say I can't do that. Is there a way to make modifications to ClassA without actually touching the current ClassA? My approach is to have a new class inherit from ClassA with an overridden method and then have a new class inherit from ClassB that calls the Inherited ClassA

public class InheritedClassA extends ClassA{
  @Override
  public void printout(){
    System.out.println("abcd");
  }
}

public class InheritedClassB extends ClassB{
  @Override
  public void printMethod(){
    InheritedClassA A = new InheritedClassA();
    A.printout();
  }
}

I don't like this approach though because in my actual JAR, so many classes are using ClassA that its a nightmare trying to correctly do this with all of them, which then all require the same process on them. I know you cannot overload/overwrite a whole class which is basically what I want to do. Is there another way to do this?

EDIT To make it even harder, I cannot download any new frameworks or software or anything.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

One option which may not be feasible would be to create a new version of ClassA, package it up in its own jar file, and put that ahead of the original version in your classpath.

However, this is a pretty odd scenario - why can you not update the existing jar file? Even if that means a bit of extra work, it's likely to be much cleaner in the long run than any other approach.

share|improve this answer
    
I saw that option, but isn't that sketchy at best? And the not-touching-the-jar thing isn't my call, otherwise that's what I would have gone with. I'm going to try and convince people otherwise, but backup plans are good – Daniel Jul 30 '12 at 20:04
1  
@Daniel: Not sure what you mean by "sketchy". I believe it should be fine - that the classloader will treat earlier jars in the path in preference to later ones. Just make sure they're both loaded by the same classloader. As you say, it would be much nicer to update the other jar file though... – Jon Skeet Jul 30 '12 at 20:07

I can only provide pointers as I never felt the need for it.

What you are referring to is called "Bytecode enhancement", and yes there are several frameworks to achieve it.

BCEL - http://commons.apache.org/bcel/

ASM - http://asm.ow2.org/

Usually, java developers prefer to use the inversion of control pattern. This allows the code to configure itself at runtime via a configuration file - See Spring IoC for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I would do if I could. However, I can't add anything new to the System. Sorry I didn't specify that. – Daniel Jul 30 '12 at 20:10
    
Define, "New".. can you deploy new code? new libraries ? – Olivier Refalo Jul 30 '12 at 20:12
    
I am unable to download anything off the internet – Daniel Jul 30 '12 at 20:15

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