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I'd like to compare multiple objects and return True only if all objects are not equal among themselves. I tried using the code below, but it doesn't work. If obj1 and obj3 are equal and obj2 and obj3 are not equal, the result is True.

obj1 != obj2 != obj3

I have more than 3 objects to compare. Using the code below is out of question:

all([obj1 != obj2, obj1 != obj3, obj2 != obj3])
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Is the number of objects fixed, or variable? Are they elements of an array, or in individual variables? –  jwpat7 Jul 30 '12 at 22:06
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5 Answers 5

up vote 20 down vote accepted

@Michael Hoffman's answer is good if the objects are all hashable. If not, you can use itertools.combinations:

>>> all(a != b for a, b in itertools.combinations(['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'a'], 2))
False
>>> all(a != b for a, b in itertools.combinations(['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'], 2))
True
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If the objects are all hashable, then you can see whether a frozenset of the sequence of objects has the same length as the sequence itself:

def all_different(objs):
    return len(frozenset(objs)) == len(objs)

Example:

>>> all_different([3, 4, 5])
True
>>> all_different([3, 4, 5, 3])
False
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Damn! beat me by 10 seconds. –  inspectorG4dget Jul 30 '12 at 19:59
1  
Note that this won't work if the objects are unhashable. –  BrenBarn Jul 30 '12 at 20:00
    
This doesn't work if one (or all) of the objects is a unhashable (e.g. a list) –  mgilson Jul 30 '12 at 20:01
2  
Why frozenset instead of set? –  Ned Batchelder Jul 30 '12 at 20:04
2  
Wouldn't your function be better named all_different? –  Steven Rumbalski Jul 30 '12 at 20:05
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If the objects are unhashable but orderable (for example, lists) then you can transform the itertools solution from O(n^2) to O(n log n) by sorting:

def all_different(*objs):
    s = sorted(objs)
    return all(x != y for x, y in zip(s[:-1], s[1:]))

Here's a full implementation:

def all_different(*objs):
    try:
        return len(frozenset(objs)) == len(objs)
    except TypeError:
        try:
            s = sorted(objs)
            return all(x != y for x, y in zip(s[:-1], s[1:]))
        except TypeError:
            return all(x != y for x, y in itertools.combinations(objs, 2))
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The check for hashability is far too complex (and also slightly wrong). The idiomatic way to do this in Python is to try to build a frozenset() and catch TypeError if this fails. (The test is slightly wrong because isinstance(obj, collections.Hashable) being True does not guarantee the object is actually hashable. It only checks if the object has a type that allows it in principle to be hashed. Try ([],) as a counter example.) –  Sven Marnach Jul 31 '12 at 13:17
    
@SvenMarnach thanks, fixed. –  ecatmur Jul 31 '12 at 13:31
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from itertools import combinations
all(x != y for x, y in combinations(objs, 2))
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1  
That's O(n^2) comparisons - a LOT for large lists. –  inspectorG4dget Jul 30 '12 at 20:15
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You can check that all of the items in a list are unique by converting it to a set.

my_obs = [obj1, obj2, obj3]
all_not_equal = len(set(my_obs)) == len(my_obs)
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