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I have problem with sort/order by, not working like I need.

SELECT `proc` FROM `table` ORDER BY `proc` DESC;

Result:

80.0 proc
70.0 proc
60.0 proc
50.0 proc
40.0 proc
200.0 proc
20.0 proc
190.0 proc
180.0 proc
170.0 proc
160.0 proc
150.0 proc
140.0 proc
130.0 proc
120.0 proc
110.0 proc
100.0 proc

What I need is:

200.0 proc
190.0 proc
180.0 proc
170.0 proc
160.0 proc
150.0 proc
140.0 proc
130.0 proc
120.0 proc
110.0 proc
100.0 proc
90.0 proc
80.0 proc
70.0 proc
60.0 proc
50.0 proc
40.0 proc
20.0 proc

How to do it ?

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6  
Sounds like you're using varchar instead of decimal. –  bfrohs Jul 30 '12 at 19:59
3  
Is the actual text 80.0 proc in the column? –  LittleBobbyTables Jul 30 '12 at 20:00
    
yes varchar, yes column contain text: 80.0 proc, etc. –  waza123 Jul 30 '12 at 20:01
    
Why do they all contain the text proc? Even the column is named proc? I dont get it –  Esailija Jul 30 '12 at 20:04
    
possible duplicate of Natural Sort in MySQL - if that doesn't work, look at all the questions linked to it. –  Juhana Jul 30 '12 at 20:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It looks like "proc" is a string (varchar field), so it gets ordered lexically. If it is so, you can probably order it by

SELECT `proc` FROM `table` ORDER BY convert(`proc`, decimal) DESC;

Please note that such queries will be very slow, and for any serious usage it's better to use numeric columns for storing numeric data.

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working, thanks! –  waza123 Jul 30 '12 at 20:04
3  
I would not have expected that to work but it does –  Conrad Frix Jul 30 '12 at 20:04
2  
Interesting, would have thought converting '80.0 proc' to decimal would fail. Anyone know why? –  Bort Jul 30 '12 at 20:06
1  
@ConradFrix thanks for SQL Fiddle. Hadn't seen that before. –  Jordan Jul 30 '12 at 20:15
1  
@Bort: in my testing, it's as if the function reads through the string up to the first "invalid" character, up to the point where the string can no longer be converted to decimal. It does the conversion on the part that can be converted. And fair warning, it considers a "comma" to be an invalid character, CONVERT('123,456.78',DECIMAL) will return 123. –  spencer7593 Jul 30 '12 at 21:05

The column field for proc is a VARCHAR or CHAR and it's treating it as a literal string--sorting alphabetically.

Convert the column to double or float or cast the value

SELECT `proc` FROM `table` ORDER BY CAST(`proc` AS decimal) DESC;
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nice, but I can't change it, need a solution. –  waza123 Jul 30 '12 at 20:02
    
Doubles or floats can't hold alphanumeric values like "100.0 proc". –  Juhana Jul 30 '12 at 20:06
    
should not work –  Arif Jul 30 '12 at 20:08
    
Yes, if at all possible, the column should be changed appropriately (and the fact that 'proc' appears in every row is a concern). However, depending on what's actually being stored, floating-point types are not the correct choice - I may have recommended either an integer type (if the decimal places did not matter) or a decimal type (if exact accuracy was required). –  Clockwork-Muse Jul 30 '12 at 20:09
2  
It apparently works, only needs to be written as cast(proc as decimal) –  che Jul 30 '12 at 20:12

There's something fundamentally wrong with your table design. Instead of using values like '80.0 proc' in a VARCHAR column, you should just keep 80.0 in a column of type REAL (or any suitable numerical type that's appropriate for your data). You could do dynamic conversion, only to be used in the ORDER BY expression, but this is also likely to deteriorate the performance of your query.

Adding "proc" to your text here doesn't seem useful, and it will also prevent you from doing a simple conversion.

Surprisingly (see che's answer), apparently, convert(..., decimal) is capable of ignoring the trailing rubbish. It's not something you should rely on in general, though.

The documentation on this aspect of the conversion isn't particularly clear. It's worth reading that section to be aware of the limitations of string/numbers (which would happen in general), for example:

mysql> SELECT '18015376320243459' = 18015376320243459;
        -> 0

If that behaviour changed, you could probably use replace() in this case, just to get rid of ' proc'.

For something more complex, you could potentially use a regular expression replacement to extract the numerical value from your string and cast it into a number before sorting, but this is not supported out of the box in MySQL and that would be rather clunky anyway (fix the problem at its source: your column data type).

To deal with your legacy data, you could add an extra column and use an external program (in any language that's capable of doing a regexp replace), which shouldn't be too difficult.

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