Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the book Javascript: The Good Parts by Douglas Crockford, this is all the author has to say about the continue Statement:

The continue statement jumps to the top of the loop. I have never seen a piece of code that was not improved by refactoring it to remove the continue statement.

This really confuses me. I know Crockford has some very opinionated views on Javascript, but this just sounds entirely wrong to me.

First of all, continue does more than just jump to the top of a loop. By default, it also progresses to the next iteration. So isn't Crockford's statement just completely false information?

More importantly, I do not entirely understand why continue would even be considered to be bad. This post provides what seems to be the general assumption: Why is continue inside a loop a bad idea?

Although I understand how continue may make code difficult to read in certain instances, I think it is just as likely that it can make code more readable. For instance:

var someArray=['blah',5,'stuff',7];
for(var i=0;i<someArray.length;i++){
    if(typeof someArray[i]==='number'){
        for(var j=0;j<someArray[i];j++){
            console.log(j);
        }
    }
}

This could be refactored into:

var someArray=['blah',5,'stuff',7];
for(var i=0;i<someArray.length;i++){
    if(typeof someArray[i]!=='number'){
        continue;
    }
    for(var j=0;j<someArray[i];j++){
        console.log(j);
    }
}

continue isn't particularly beneficial in this specific example, but it does demonstrate the fact that it reduces the nesting depth. In more complex code, this could potentially increase readability.

Crockford provides no explanation as to why continue should not be used, so is there some deeper significance behind this opinion that I am missing?

share|improve this question
    
The keyword continue is a tool - use it where applicable. SOmetimes it's necessary, most times it isn't. The only time it's bad is when you didn't need to use it but were too lazy or sloppy to do it another way. –  slugster Jul 30 '12 at 20:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 29 down vote accepted

The statement is ridiculous. continue can be abused, but it often helps readability.

Typical use:

for (somecondition)
{
    if (!firsttest) continue;

    some_provisional_work_that_is_almost_always_needed();

    if (!further_tests()) continue;

    do_expensive_operation();
}

The goal is to avoid 'lasagna' code, where you have deeply nested conditionals.

Edited to add:

Yes, this is ultimately subjective. Here's my metric for deciding.

Edited one last time:

This example is too simple, of course, and you can always replace nested conditionals with function calls. But then you may have to pass data into the nested functions by reference, which can create refactoring problems at least as bad as the ones you're trying to avoid.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd also add that readability is subjective and while most people seem to like using continue, others may not. For the same reason, people hate gotos, which are not inherently evil (only abuse of gotos is evil). –  Wug Jul 30 '12 at 20:06

I am personally on the other side than the majority here. The problem is usually not with the shown continue patterns, but with more deeply nested ones, where possible code paths may become hard to see.

But even your example with one continue does not show improvement in my opinion that is justifiable. From my experience a few continue statements are a nightmare to refactor later (even for static languages better suited for automated refactoring like Java, especially when someone later puts there break too).

Thus, I would add a comment to the quote you gave:

Refactoring to remove continue statement inreases your further ability to refactor.

And inner loops are really good candidated for e.g. extract function. Such refactoring is done when the inner loop becomes complex and then continue may make it painful.

These are my honest opinions after working professionally on JavaScript projects in a team, there rules that Douglas Crockford talks about really show their merits.

share|improve this answer
1  
I am not sure I know what you mean. Would you mind giving an example of where continue will become a "nightmare to refactor"? Also, what do you mean by "extract function"? Is this a design pattern? –  twiz Jul 30 '12 at 22:08
    
"extract function" (also can be googled under "extract method") is a refactoring technique to extract part of body of a function to a new separate function. Even the simple code in another answer here with 2 continue statements would need to be rewritten (to get rid of continue statements) in order to create a new function out of the body of the for loop. When you get bigger bodies with more nested continue statements, it takes a lot of time to clean up your code. –  jJ' Jul 31 '12 at 0:31

Douglas Crockford may feel this way because he doesn't believe in assignment within a conditional. In fact, his program JSlint doesn't even let you do it, even though Javascript does. He would never write:

Example 1

while (rec = getrec())
{   
    if (condition1(rec))
        continue;

    doSomething(rec);
}

but, I'm guessing he would write something like:

Example 2

rec = getrec();

while (rec)
{   
    if (!condition(rec))
        doSomething(rec);

    rec = getrec();
}

Both of these work, but if you accidentally mix these styles you get an infinite loop:

Example 3

rec = getrec();

while (rec)
{   
    if (condition1(rec))
        continue;

    rec = getrec();
}

This could be part of why he doesn't like continues.

share|improve this answer
    
You may have a point, but I believe he also generally opposes while loops in the first place. –  twiz Jul 27 at 1:21
1  
@twiz: My point applies to for loops and do loops as well. Surely he believes in some kind of loop! –  Tom Lucas Jul 27 at 1:28

Personally, I have never heard anything bad about using the continue statement. It is true that it could (most of the time) be easily avoided, but there is no reason to not use it. I find that loops can be a lot cleaner looking and more readable with continue statements in place.

share|improve this answer

Continue is an extremely useful tool for saving computation cycles in algorithms. Sure, it can be improperly used but so can every other keyword or approach. When striving for performance, it can be useful to take an inverse approach to path divergence with a conditional statement. A continue can facilitate the inverse by allowing less efficient paths to be skipped when possible.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.