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This performance test is wrong or the system cache is working with exceptional performance?

This is my result :
[13] number of interactions 100000 : 63 milliseconds
[14] number of interactions 100000 : 139 milliseconds
[12] number of interactions 100000 : 47 milliseconds
[15] number of interactions 100000 : 44 milliseconds
End of test.

Hardware : x86 Family 6 Model 23 Stepping GenuineIntel ~2992 Mhz 3.327 MB, 5.1.2600 Service Pack 3

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Runtime.Caching;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Threading;

namespace CacheNet40
{
    public class CacheTest
    {
        private ObjectCache cache;

        public CacheTest()
        {
            cache = MemoryCache.Default;
        }

        public void AddItem(CacheItem item, double span)
        {
            CacheItemPolicy cp = new CacheItemPolicy();
            cp.SlidingExpiration.Add(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(span));

            cache.Add(item, cp);
        }
        public Object GetItem(string key)
        {
            return cache.Get(key);
        }
    }

    class Program
    {        
        private static CacheTest Cache = new CacheTest();
        private static string allowedChars = "abcdefghijkmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789!@$?_-";
        private static int counter = 0;
        private static readonly object locker = new object();

        static string CreateRandomString(int passwordLength, int idx)
        {            
            char[] chars = new char[passwordLength];
            Random rd = new Random((int)DateTime.Now.Ticks + idx);

            for (int i = 0; i < passwordLength; i++)
            {
                chars[i] = allowedChars[rd.Next(0, allowedChars.Length)];
            }
            return new string(chars);
        }

        private static void CacheAccessTes()
        {
            int span = 5;
            string key;
            string data;
            int itens = 1000;
            int interactions = 100000;
            int cont = 0;
            int index = 0;
            List<string> keys = new List<string>();

            lock (locker)
            {
                counter++;
            }

            cont = itens;

            //populates it with data in the cache
            do
            {                
                key = CreateRandomString(127, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId + cont);
                keys.Add(key);

                data = CreateRandomString(156000, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId + cont + 1);

                CacheItem ci = new CacheItem(key, data);
                Cache.AddItem(ci, span);

                cont--;
            }
            while (cont > 0);

            cont = interactions;
            index = 0;

            //test readings
            Stopwatch stopWatch = new Stopwatch();
            stopWatch.Start();            
            do
            {
                Object ci = Cache.GetItem(keys[index]);

                ci = null;
                index++;
                if (index == itens)
                {
                    index = 0;
                }

                cont--;
            }
            while (cont > 0);
            stopWatch.Stop();

            lock (locker)
            {
                counter--;
            }

            string outstring = String.Format("[{0}] number of interactions {1} : {2} milliseconds", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId, interactions, stopWatch.ElapsedMilliseconds );
            Console.WriteLine(outstring);
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            for (int threads = 0; threads < 4; threads++)
            {
                Thread thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(CacheAccessTes));
                thread.Start();
            }

            Thread.Sleep(1000);

            while (true)
            {
                lock (locker)
                {
                    if (counter == 0) break;
                }
                Thread.Sleep(100);
            }

            Console.WriteLine("End of test.");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
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3  
Looks OK to me. What makes you doubt the results? –  Oded Jul 30 '12 at 20:28
2  
What's the actual issue here? What exactly is astonishing? –  Bob Horn Jul 30 '12 at 21:33
    
I found the extraordinary performance, and this made ​​me suspicious. –  lsalamon Jul 30 '12 at 21:45

3 Answers 3

Looks good. Although timings below a second are not very reliable; you might have run into a garbage collect, your PC might do something else for a short while, first time JIT compile etc.

So increase the count. Which should also make the results for each thread end up closer together.

Some test I did last week made it to eight million iterations per second (doing not a lot, but still) singlethreaded. So yes, PC's are fast these days ;-)

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The problem is the StopWatch class which can't be used on multi-core machines! (I'm assuming you have a multi-core CPU) Something to do with how the BIOS handles that counter when a thread moves from one core to another (even a single threaded application jumps cores!).

Edit:
Check out - http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms644904(v=vs.85).aspx - specifically the remarks section. There is a stackoverflow post as well - Multicore and thread aware .Net stopwatch?. End Edit

I have searched high and low for the best method to measure app performance and the most reliable I have come up with is DateTime.UtcNow. Get the start and end time and then take the difference between them. You have to loop your code enough to get past the low precision, but no other method I have come across gives more reliable accuracy.

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2  
@exacerbatedexpert - before calling things FUD, why don't you research the matter. Take a look at - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… - and the remarks section. Specificaly states that due to BIOS bugs you can get different result, which in turn means it is pointless to use StopWatch on a multi core machine (without setting thread affinity). –  Marko Aug 30 '12 at 5:50
    
@exacerbatedexpert - (I did read your KB article). The MSDN article remarks section doesn't specify that every single BIOS has that bug, but it also doesn't specify that only a few BIOS-s have bugs. So now it depends on how do you interpet what is written. I maintain that the text in the remarks section implies that those bugs are widely present and that is why you shoudln't rely on stopwatch giving accurate results on multicore CPUs (without setting thread affinity). There are multiple posts on the web of people having problems with stopwatch, which should all support my claim as well... –  Marko Sep 1 '12 at 10:56
2  
I don't know if the StopWatch class was a problem in this case (processor spec looks like a Xeon but don't know if it's multi-core or not). However, I've definitely encountered problems with the StopWatch class in my own code so I'd advise not using it. Problems have included occasionally coming up with a negative time interval. More commonly, however, successive values are obviously incorrect, with a later value being smaller than an earlier value. –  Simon Tewsi Jan 16 '13 at 23:04
2  
... don't you love it when people just delete their proven-wrong comments –  Alex Nov 14 '13 at 9:37

On my machine, it's about 40 ms, or 400 ns per GetItem call.

I traced the calls under debugger, it's about 2000 instructions per GetItem on my I7 machine. That is more than I would expect.

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