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I am creating a pty using openpty in C, and sharing it between master/parent and slave/child. The child could fork/exec and pass on the file descriptor to other programs. I want to inject commands to the child, but if I pass them immediately they get lost. How can I tell from the parent process that someone is blocking on input from stdin? I happen to be working on SUSE 10, but I would prefer a distro independent solution.

Edit : The answer to this question is still interesting to me, but may not be relevant to the problem. I'll get to that later.

A simplified version of the code would be to use the script source code (some of the headers may need to be fixed), and add the lines

char* command = "echo 'Hello World!'\r\n", written = 0;
(void)write(master, command, strlen(command));
(void)write(STDOUT_FILENO, "Sent command\r\n", 14);

before the big

for (;;) {

in main.

I had been executing a csh from script, but I then noticed that the script command was dumping some garbage (as viewed in vi)

^[[>0;115;0c

onto the parent's stdin. If I instead exec a bash shell, nothing gets dumped out and the program injects the command just fine.

I'm still curious as to the answer to the question being asked, but it is clearly no longer relevant to my problem, as there is something else going on. If anyone does know how to see if a pty is being read feel free to answer.

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if both are in-house built, then you can sync them. probably by means of signals? also post your code. –  tuxuday Aug 1 '12 at 7:59

2 Answers 2

As far as I know, file descriptors will not survive a trip to another process. You can share them between threads, though.

As for knowing when there is something to read, I'd try using select with the appropriate file descriptor in the read set.

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The file descriptor exists before fork(). So after fork() both processes (child and parent) got the file descriptor. So there is no need for file descriptor transfer between existing processes. –  User1 Jul 31 '12 at 12:06
    
I want to know when someone is reading, select on the read fds will tell me somebody has written. –  MWB Jul 31 '12 at 14:23

I have noticed same problem about losting stuff when I write to master fd.

Problem can be avoided by using the slave fd for writing. And the master fd for stdin of child. This way:

int main(void)
{
    int master_fd = -1;
    int slave_fd  = -1;

    if( openpty( &master_fd, &slave_fd, NULL, NULL, NULL ) != -1 )
    {
        const pid_t child_pid = fork();
        if( child_pid != -1 )
        {
            if( child_pid )
            {
                const char command[] = "command\n";
                close( master_fd );
                write( slave_fd, command, strlen(command) );
                close( slave_fd );
            }
            else
            {
                close( slave_fd );
                dup2( master_fd, STDIN_FILENO );
                execlp( "/bin/cat", "cat", (char*)0 );
            }
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

You may even add delays to child process and it still works. So parent process can exit before the child process do anything:

~ # temp_test
~ # command
cat: read error: Input/output error

~ #

EDIT:

Little bit different example, because error print out of cat causes confusing:

        if( child_pid )
        {
            const char command[] = "command\n";
            close( master_fd );
            write( slave_fd, command, sizeof(command) );
            close( slave_fd );
        }
        else
        {
            char buffer[100];
            ssize_t i;
            ssize_t len;

            close( slave_fd );

            do
            {
                len = read( master_fd, buffer, sizeof(buffer) );
                for( i = 0; i < len; i++ )
                    printf("%c", buffer[i] );
            } while( len > 0 );
        }

And result:

~ # temp_test
command
~ #
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure what you are showing here, as far as I can tell cat isn't reading anything since "cat: read error: Input/output error" indicates that you forgot to run login_tty on the child, and thus the child is incapable of using the pty as it is not the controlling process. –  MWB Jul 31 '12 at 15:47
    
@MWB : cat prints "command\n" and then it prints the error. Maybe cat was poor example, because it produces that error line to the end. I can change the example if you want? –  User1 Aug 1 '12 at 7:42

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