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I have a PHP CLI script that I invoke using

php application.php --args etc

However I would like to alias the script so that I can just execute the script without prefixing the command line call with php and having the '.php' extension.

application --args etc

Is this possible? I pressume it is but lack the knowledge or probably the correct terms to search for in Google.

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4 Answers 4

You could just use a shebang to define the application to use for execution from within the file. So at the beginning of your script you would place something like this:

#!/path/to/cli/php
<?php
// start your PHP here

When executed from command line the OS will know to use the specified PHP CLI application to execute the script. Obviously the path to the PHP CLI excutable will vary based on your system and should be substituted with what I have shown above.

This is more flexible that aliasing IMO, as you don't need to enter an alias for each PHP script you may want to run in such a manner from the command line.

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Ok, having done that and chmod +x as OnlyAngel said below how do I actually run this now? Calling application or application.php just results in command not found –  buggedcom Jul 30 '12 at 21:33
    
If you are within the directory of execution you would typically type './application' or if not in teh current directory '/path/to/application' If you are wanting to truly be able to execute the script from anywhere just by typing 'application' then you would need to look at adding an alias. –  Mike Brant Jul 30 '12 at 21:34
    
ah. trouble is ./application is a directory by the same name containing all the apps files. –  buggedcom Jul 30 '12 at 21:36
    
Well you wouldn't be able to name the file 'application' if there is already a sub-directory in the same directory by the name of application. The './' just references the current directory unlike '../' which references the parent directory. –  Mike Brant Jul 30 '12 at 21:39

You need to do the thing that Mike Brants says add the next line to your sample.php file

#!/path/to/cli/php

but also you have to do these in linux

chmod +x sample.php

To tell the linux (unix) machine to interprete these file as an excecutable

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ahah. alias can be added to the .base_profile

http://www.hypexr.org/bash_tutorial.php#alias

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Use a so called 'shebang':

In the first line of your script add:

#!/usr/bin/php

where /usr/bin/php is the path to your php cli executable. That's it !

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