Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am having some trouble designing a solution that uses command pattern but with generics. Basically, I have defined a generic interface that has just one method that returns a list of generic object.

public interface IExecute<T>
{
   List<T> Execute();
}

public class SimpleExecute : IExecute<int>
{
   public List<int> Execute()
   { return a list of ints... }
}

public class Main
{
   private List<IExecute<T>> ExecuteTasks; // This is not valid in C#
}

Since generic list of generics isn't valid, I implemented a non-generic interface IExceute and made the generic interface extend the non-generic one and was able to create a list

public interface IExecute {}

public interface IExecute<T> : Execute
{
   List<T> Execute();
}

private List<IExecute> ExecuteTasks;

However, now I am not sure how can I loop through the ExecuteTasks and call the execute method.

I have tried my best to explain the issue. Please, let me know if you need further explanation of my issue.

Thanks

share|improve this question
3  
If the instances of IExecute are not all going to be the same type, then what benefit is being provided by the generics? –  mellamokb Jul 30 '12 at 21:31
    
So, each Execute() returns List<T> for some unknown T. What do you want to do with the result? –  svick Jul 30 '12 at 21:34
    
I am going to write them back to an excel spreadsheet using a class which uses reflection and type info to determine the object type and determines the name of the worksheet from the object's attribute info –  user320587 Jul 30 '12 at 21:42
3  
@user320587 In that case, why do you even need generics? Why can't you have interface IExecute { IList Execute(); } and nothing else? –  svick Jul 30 '12 at 21:44
    
@svick Hmmm. that's a very valid point. Now you got me thinking clearly. I agree with you and just going to use IList. Thanks –  user320587 Jul 30 '12 at 21:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The best you can do is this:

public interface IExecute { IList Execute(); } 

Then, for example:

public class SimpleExecute : IExecute<int>   
{   
   public List<int> Execute()   
   { return a list of ints... }   
   IList IExecute.Execute() { return this.Execute(); }
}

(Note the explicit interface member implementation for the non-generic IExecute.Execute())

Then:

List<IExecute> iExecuteList = //whatever;
foreach (var ix in iExecuteList)
{
    IList list = ix.Execute();
}

You can't get the specific generic list type at compile time (for example, IList<string>, IList<int>) for the same reason you can't store an int and a string in the same generic list (unless the type argument is object).

share|improve this answer
public class Main
{
   private List<IExecute<T> ExecuteTasks; // This is not valid in C#
}

There are 2 errors here:

  • T is an unknown class. You should have specified the correct type

  • List< doesn't have a close angle bracket '>'. Each opening bracket must have a closing one. It should look like List<IExecute<T>>

share|improve this answer
    
I think the point here is that it should be a list of tasks with different Ts. –  svick Jul 30 '12 at 21:37
    
1. Yes, that's the whole point of the question... 2. Obviously a typo on the OP's part. –  mellamokb Jul 30 '12 at 21:37
    
I know it's not the answer he wanted to hear, but he made some mistakes and I tried to correct them. –  HeM01 Jul 30 '12 at 21:39
    
yes that's a typo. I have corrected it –  user320587 Jul 30 '12 at 21:39
    
@HeM01: Sure. However, it would be preferable to address these types of issues in the comments rather than as an answer. Thanks! –  mellamokb Jul 30 '12 at 21:41
List<IExecute<T>> ExecuteTasks 

is not valid because T is not defined anywhere in the containing class.

Something like this should work instead though:

List<IExecute<Object>> ExecuteTasks;

ExecuteTasks.Add(new SimpleExecute());

Or

public class Main<T>
{
    List<IExecute<T>> ExecuteTasks 
}
share|improve this answer

Try looping through every item by using a foreach loop:

foreach(var item in ExecuteTasks)
{
    item.Execute();
    //...
}
share|improve this answer

When you are using generics, consider that IExecute<Class1> is a completely different interface than IExecute<Class2>. In this case, if you were to invoke a common method in both, you'd need another interface; e.g. IExecute.

public interface IExecute<T>
{
    List<T> Execute();
}

public interface IExecute
{
    IList Execute();
}

public class SimpleExecute : IExecute<int>, IExecute
{
    IList IExecute.Execute()
    {
        return Execute();
    }

    public List<int> Execute()
    {
        return new List<int>();
    }
}

Then, to loop you can simply use foreach and/or LINQ.

List<IExecute> entries = new List<IExecute> {new SimpleExecute()};

foreach (var result in entries.Select(x => x.Execute()))
{
}

What you are trying to achieve seems correct because you consider IExecute as a single interface, but in fact it is a "template" for an interface which will be created at compile time.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.