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Whenever I assign an already declared Matrix to somethnig else my program exits unexpectedly.

I really don't know why this happens, I was under the impression that leaving assignment operators for the compiler to generate was the best thing to do unless you absolutely had to overload it, which makes me think there's something wrong with my constructor or something?

Example:

Matrix rotation = rotationMatrix3(Y, degToRad(20.0f));
Vector3 left = rotation * direction_;

rotation = rotationMatrix3(Y, degToRad(-20.0f)); //crash
Vector3 right = rotation * direction_;

Here's my Matrix class:

Matrix.h

enum Axis {
    X, Y, Z,
};

class Matrix {
public:
    Matrix(int cols, int rows);
    Matrix(int cols, int rows, const float values[]);
    ~Matrix();

    float& operator()(int col, int row);
    float  operator()(int col, int row) const;
    inline int cols() const { return cols_; }
    inline int rows() const { return rows_; }

private:
    int cols_, rows_;
    float* values_;
};

Vector3 operator*(const Matrix& m, const Vector3& v);

Matrix rotationMatrix3(int axis, float rads);

Matrix.cpp

Matrix::Matrix(int cols, int rows) : cols_(cols), rows_(rows), values_(NULL) {
    values_ = new float[rows_ * cols_];
}

Matrix::Matrix(int cols, int rows, const float values[]) : cols_(cols), rows_(rows), values_(NULL) {
    values_ = new float[rows_ * cols_];

    for(int c = 0; c < cols; ++c) {
        for(int r = 0; r < rows; ++r) {
            (*this)(c, r) = values[r * cols + c];
        }
    }
}

Matrix::~Matrix() {
    delete [] values_;
}

float& Matrix::operator()(int col, int row) {
    return values_[row * cols_ + col];
}

float Matrix::operator()(int col, int row) const {
    return values_[row * cols_ + col];
}

Vector3 operator*(const Matrix& m, const Vector3& v) {
    if(m.cols() != 3) {
        throw std::logic_error("Matrix must have only 3 cols");
    }

    Vector3 result;
    result.x = m(0, 0) * v.x + m(1, 0) * v.y + m(2, 0) * v.z;
    result.y = m(0, 1) * v.x + m(1, 1) * v.y + m(2, 1) * v.z;
    result.z = m(0, 2) * v.x + m(1, 2) * v.y + m(2, 2) * v.z;

    return result;
}

Matrix rotationMatrix3(int axis, float rads) {
    float c = static_cast<float>(cos(rads));
    float s = static_cast<float>(sin(rads));

    if(axis == X) {
        const float mat[] = { 1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f,
                              0.0f, c,    -s,
                              0.0f, s,    c };
        return Matrix(3, 3, mat);
    } else if(axis == Y) {
        const float mat[] = { c,    0.0f, s,
                              0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f,
                              -s,   0.0f, c };
        return Matrix(3, 3, mat);
    } else if(axis == Z) {
        const float mat[] = { c,    -s,   0.0f,
                              s,    c,    0.0f,
                              0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f };
        return Matrix(3, 3, mat);
    } else {
        throw std::logic_error("Unknown axis");
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Well, if you have a raw pointer member in your class, then yes, you absolutely have to provide your own implementation of a copy constructor and assignment operator. –  Greg Hewgill Jul 30 '12 at 23:13
    
Vector3 operator*(const Matrix& m, const Vector3& v); I'm not sure what you are trying to do here, but if you're trying to overload the Matrix * operator then it should be Vector3 Matrix::operator*(const Vector3& v); –  ctor Jul 30 '12 at 23:22
    
@Loggie: There's nothing wrong with the overload of operator*(const Matrix& m, const Vector3& v); Overloaded operators can be implemented either as member functions or as free functions. Rarge is taking the free function approach. –  David Hammen Jul 30 '12 at 23:36
    
That I did not know I apologise and thank you :) –  ctor Jul 31 '12 at 0:05
    
@Loggie: In fact, free functions should be preferred. :) –  GManNickG Jul 31 '12 at 1:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I was under the impression that leaving assignment operators for the compiler to generate was the best thing to do unless you absolutely had to overload it, which makes me think there's something wrong with my constructor or something?

Drop that impression. Those freebies from the language are rarely the "right" thing to do. You have a raw pointer float* values_; in your class. You absolutely have to overload the copy constructor and the assignment operator here.

share|improve this answer
    
I implemented a copy constructor and a assignment operator and the problem went away, Thank you. –  Lerp Jul 30 '12 at 23:50
    
I just tried replacing my raw pointer with unique_ptr<float[]> and this, with a few changes to the constructors also fixed the crash without the need for the copy constructor and the assignment operator. Which fix would be the better approach? –  Lerp Jul 31 '12 at 0:00
    
Unique pointers aren't copyable. If you are only using 3x3 matrices, don't use a pointer, period. Use a 3x3 matrix, which is copyable. If you do want multiple sizes of arrays, but you know the matrix size at compile time, you might think instead of using templates. It's pretty hard to avoid writing your own copy constructor / assignment operator if you need runtime array sizes and you need to do something like Matrix a; Matrix b; ... a=b; . –  David Hammen Jul 31 '12 at 1:03

Yep, make a copy constructor that takes a matrix. Otherwise you will be copying the pointer values_ which is subsequently deleted in the original return value that immediately drops out of scope.

My advice to you... You're obviously creating classes to do 3D. DON'T make an arbitrary-sized matrix class for this. Just make a basic 4x4 homogeneous matrix (or 4x3 or 3x3 if you must). Hard-coded. Single array of values - no dynamic allocation. Save you a lot of time, heap fragmentation, and annoying sanity tests. You are never going to run this class with a 5x17 matrix or whatever. So don't code for it.

You commonly need a 2d, 3d, or 4d vector, and a 3d or 4d square matrix. That's all. So make your classes:

Vector2
Vector3
Vector4
Matrix3
Matrix4
share|improve this answer
    
Could you explain why this causes the program to exit instead of just leaving the pointer pointing to nothing? I will heed your advice to not try and add support for something I most likely won't need. I'm trying to stick to the "don't program it till you need it" mentality. –  Lerp Jul 30 '12 at 23:35
1  
Sure. The problem, I expect, is immediately after the call to rotationMatrix3(). It creates a Matrix instance and returns it to the caller. The caller then assigns that matrix to the variable rotation via default copy, which takes the value of the (temporary) result's rows_, cols_ and values_ members and copies them to the new instance (rotation). The temporary matrix is then deleted, so the memory pointed to by its values_ is no longer available. On the next line, you attempt to use this rotation instance, which now references a block of memory that has been freed. –  paddy Jul 30 '12 at 23:46
    
Ahh of course. I forgot the line below would try to access the values. I haved implemented a copy constructor and an assignment operator and the problem went away, Thank you. I'll now change it to a fixed size matrix too :) –  Lerp Jul 30 '12 at 23:51
1  
Remember with fixed-size matrices you get a big speedup, as you no longer need to check values for rows and cols, you don't do any heap allocation, and you can hard-code array offsets for things like multiplication, unroll loops, etc... –  paddy Jul 30 '12 at 23:54

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