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I want to create a function pointer to a function that will handle a subset of cases for a function that takes a variable parameter list. The use case is casting a function that takes ... to a function that takes a specific list of parameters, so you can deal with variable parameters without dealing with va_list and friends.

In the following example code, I'm casting a function with a variable parameters to a function with a hard-coded parameter list (and vice versa). This works (or happens to work), but I don't know if's a coincidence due to the calling convention in use. (I tried it on two different x86_64-based platforms.)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdarg.h>

void function1(char* s, ...)
{
    va_list ap;
    int tmp;

    va_start(ap, s);
    tmp = va_arg(ap, int);
    printf(s, tmp);
    va_end(ap);
}

void function2(char* s, int d)
{
    printf(s, d);
}

typedef void (*functionX_t)(char*, int);
typedef void (*functionY_t)(char*, ...);

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int x = 42;

    /* swap! */
    functionX_t functionX = (functionX_t) function1;
    functionY_t functionY = (functionY_t) function2;

    function1("%d\n", x);
    function2("%d\n", x);
    functionX("%d\n", x);
    functionY("%d\n", x);

    return 0;
}

Is this undefined behavior? If yes, can anyone give an example of a platform where this won't work, or a way to tweak my example in such a way that it will fail, given a more complex use case?


Edit: To address the implication that this code would break with more complex arguments, I extended my example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdarg.h>

struct crazy
{
    float f;
    double lf;
    int d;
    unsigned int ua[2];
    char* s;
};

void function1(char* s, ...)
{
    va_list ap;
    struct crazy c;

    va_start(ap, s);
    c = va_arg(ap, struct crazy);
    printf(s, c.s, c.f, c.lf, c.d, c.ua[0], c.ua[1]);
    va_end(ap);
}

void function2(char* s, struct crazy c)
{
    printf(s, c.s, c.f, c.lf, c.d, c.ua[0], c.ua[1]);
}

typedef void (*functionX_t)(char*, struct crazy);
typedef void (*functionY_t)(char*, ...);

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    struct crazy c = 
    {
        .f = 3.14,
        .lf = 3.1415,
        .d = -42,
        .ua = { 0, 42 },
        .s = "this is crazy"
    };


    /* swap! */
    functionX_t functionX = (functionX_t) function1;
    functionY_t functionY = (functionY_t) function2;

    function1("%s %f %lf %d %u %u\n", c);
    function2("%s %f %lf %d %u %u\n", c);
    functionX("%s %f %lf %d %u %u\n", c);
    functionY("%s %f %lf %d %u %u\n", c);

    return 0;
}

It still works. Can anyone point out a specific example of when this would fail?

$ gcc -Wall -g -o varargs -O9 varargs.c
$ ./varargs
this is crazy 3.140000 3.141500 -42 0 42
this is crazy 3.140000 3.141500 -42 0 42
this is crazy 3.140000 3.141500 -42 0 42
this is crazy 3.140000 3.141500 -42 0 42
share|improve this question
2  
"Is this undefined behavior?" Yes. Calling a function via an incompatible function pointer always yields undefined behavior. –  James McNellis Jul 30 '12 at 23:35
    
It seems to me (at least by example) that pushing parameters onto the stack is done in a consistent way regardless of if a variadic call is used or not. So while it may indeed be "undefined" per the spec (or maybe just not mentioned?), is the behavior ever actually inconsistent? –  Mike Jul 31 '12 at 0:13
2  
@Mike: Non-variadic parameters are passed through CPU registers whenever possible (at least on x86). They are not pushed on the stack at all. This is one reason why it won't work. –  AndreyT Jul 31 '12 at 0:16
    
"It seems to me (at least by example)" -- So you think you can generalize from a single implementation on a single architecture? This is fundamentally the wrong way to go about such things. 'while it may indeed be "undefined" per the spec (or maybe just not mentioned?)' -- what's the difference between lack of definition and lack of mention? The standard defines undefined behavior as "behavior, upon use of a nonportable or erroneous program construct or of erroneous data, for which this International Standard imposes no requirements." –  Jim Balter Jul 31 '12 at 2:40
    
@JimBalter, of course not. If I were going to write evil code like this, I'd most certainly write some good unit tests around it to ensure it works on all platforms I wanted to run it on. ;-) –  Mike Jul 31 '12 at 2:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Casting the pointer to a different function pointer type is perfectly safe. But the only thing that the language guarantees is that you can later cast it back to the original type and obtain the original pointer value.

Calling the function through a pointer forcefully converted to incompatible function pointer type leads to undefined behavior. This applies to all incompatible function pointer types, regardless of whether they are variadic or not.

The code you posted produces undefined behavior: not at the point of the cast, but at the point of the call.


Trying to chase examples "where it would fail" is a pointless endeavor, but it should be easy anyway, since parameter passing conventions (both low-level and language-level) are vastly different. For example, the code below normally will not "work" in practice

void foo(const char *s, float f) { printf(s, f); }

int main() {
  typedef void (*T)(const char *s, ...);
  T p = (T) foo;
  float f = 0.5;
  p("%f\n", f);
}

Prints zero instead of 0.5 (GCC)

share|improve this answer
    
The example code in the question is clearly calling the function. Just casting the pointer in this context would not make much sense I'm afraid. –  Mastermnd Jul 30 '12 at 23:55
    
Nice example, thanks! Your example prints 0.500000 for me on OS X, but 0.000000 on Linux (x64). –  Mike Jul 31 '12 at 0:17

Yes, this is undefined behavior.

It just so happens to work because the pointers are lining up for your current compiler, platform and parameter types. Try doing this with doubles and other types and you'll probably be able to reproduce weird behavior.

Even if you don't, this is very risky code.

I am assuming you are annoyed by the varargs. Consider defining a common set of parameters in a union or struct, and then pass that.

share|improve this answer
1  
Actually not just annoyed; it's a case where I have an API without a v version of the same function. For example, if it was something like printf there's always vprintf, but these don't have equivalent functions that take a va_list. I don't own that API, so I can't just define a struct and pass that in. –  Mike Jul 30 '12 at 23:46
2  
Unfortunately, in that case, the safe route is to create a wrapper for each call and parse the varargs –  Mastermnd Jul 30 '12 at 23:53

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