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How to move a 2D object in the direction of a point (not a GL_POINTS, but coordinates) using OpenGL?


For a better understanding of my code:

I've splited most of my code into different source codes, but this is the one that is actually creating the shapes and setting the scene:

void setupScene(int clearColor[]) {
    glClearColor(clearColor[0], clearColor[1], clearColor[2], clearColor[3]);
    //glClearColor(250, 250, 250, 1.0);  //  Set the cleared screen colour to black.
    glViewport(0, 0, WINDOW_WIDTH, WINDOW_HEIGHT);  // This sets up the viewport so that the coordinates (0, 0) are at the top left of the window.

    // Set up the orthographic projection so that coordinates (0, 0) are in the top left.
    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
    glLoadIdentity();
    glOrtho(0, WINDOW_WIDTH, WINDOW_HEIGHT, 0, -10, 10);

    // Back to the modelview so we can draw stuff.
    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
    glLoadIdentity();
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT); // Clear the screen and depth buffer.
}

void drawScene() {
    setupScene((int[]){250, 250, 250, 1});

    triangle(210, WINDOW_WIDTH, WINDOW_HEIGHT);

    glBegin(GL_QUADS);
    glColor3f(RGB(80), RGB(80), RGB(80));

    glPushMatrix();
    glTranslatef(400, 400, 0);
    glVertex2d(200, 100);
    glVertex2d(100, 100);
    glVertex2d(100, 200);
    glVertex2d(200, 200);
    glPopMatrix();
    glEnd();

    glutSwapBuffers();  // Send the scene to the screen.
}

void update(int value) {
    glutPostRedisplay();  // Tell GLUT that the display has changed.
    glutTimerFunc(25, update, 0);  // Tell GLUT to call update again in 25 milliseconds.
}

PS: Sorry if I sound like a noob, but I'm just coming from Java to C++ so I could do some cross-platform games. Also I never developed a game, just some Android, iOS and BlackBerry apps.


Solution

Thanks @paddy, I was trying to understand the use of glTranslatef and came with the solution. Here is the working code, it will create a square at 100x100 and will move it until 400x200:

void setupScene(int clearColor[]) {
    glClearColor(clearColor[0], clearColor[1], clearColor[2], clearColor[3]);
    //glClearColor(250, 250, 250, 1.0);  //  Set the cleared screen colour to black.
    glViewport(0, 0, WINDOW_WIDTH, WINDOW_HEIGHT);  // This sets up the viewport so that the coordinates (0, 0) are at the top left of the window.

    // Set up the orthographic projection so that coordinates (0, 0) are in the top left.
    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
    glLoadIdentity();
    glOrtho(0, WINDOW_WIDTH, WINDOW_HEIGHT, 0, -10, 10);

    // Back to the modelview so we can draw stuff.
    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
    glLoadIdentity();
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT); // Clear the screen and depth buffer.
}

int a = 100;
int b = 200;
int x = 100;
int y = 100;

void drawScene() {
    setupScene((int[]){250, 250, 250, 1});

    triangle(210, WINDOW_WIDTH, WINDOW_HEIGHT);

    glPushMatrix();
    glTranslatef(x, y, 0);

    glBegin(GL_QUADS);
    glColor3f(RGB(80), RGB(80), RGB(80));

    glVertex2d(b, a);
    glVertex2d(a, a);
    glVertex2d(a, b);
    glVertex2d(b, b);

    glEnd();

    glPopMatrix();

    glutSwapBuffers();  // Send the scene to the screen.
}

void update(int value) {
    if (x != 400 && y != 200) {
        x += 4;
        y += 2;
    }
    glutPostRedisplay();  // Tell GLUT that the display has changed.
    glutTimerFunc(25, update, 0);  // Tell GLUT to call update again in 25 milliseconds.
}

OpenGL is a lot more easier than I thought. Since I always had a fear about C/C++ because I was so used to Java and JavaScript, but I'm really loving how awesome, simple and elegant it is. Thanks @paddy for helping me. :)

share|improve this question
    
What have you tried? –  Code-Apprentice Jul 30 '12 at 23:50
    
@Code-Guru: With a little help I got it working. Thanks. –  Nathan Campos Jul 31 '12 at 1:06
    
Note that you don't really need the push and pop matrix calls. They are there to isolate an operation or build relative transforms from worldspace. If you're always working in worldspace, just overwrite the matrix instead. –  paddy Jul 31 '12 at 1:54
    
@paddy: What you mean is that I only need to use push an pop if there are other objects in the screen, so they don't interfere with each other? I understood it right? Also, thanks for helping me learn more about OpenGL. –  Nathan Campos Jul 31 '12 at 9:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to translate the modelview matrix. Assuming you're in modelview mode already:

glPushMatrix();
glTranslatef(x, y, z);
// Draw your shape
glPopMatrix();

[Edit]

@paddy: Something like this? I tried this but the square isn't moving. pastebin.com/2PCsy5kC

Try explicitly selecting the modelview matrix. Your example does not tell us which mode it's currently in:

glSetMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
glPushMatrix();
glTranslatef(x, y, z);
// Draw your shape
glPopMatrix();

Normally at the beginning of your render you reset everything... So you enter the GL_PROJECTION mode, call glLoadIdentity() to reset it and set up your camera, then do this for the GL_MODELVIEW matrix as well.

share|improve this answer
    
This is assuming @Nathan is using immediate mode, is it not? –  Tim Cooper Jul 30 '12 at 23:53
    
@TimCooper: No, this works in whatever you call the non-immediate mode. –  Ben Zotto Jul 30 '12 at 23:55
    
@paddy: Something like this? I tried this but the square isn't moving. pastebin.com/2PCsy5kC –  Nathan Campos Jul 31 '12 at 0:00
    
@quixoto: Even when using VBOs? –  Tim Cooper Jul 31 '12 at 0:01
    
@Nathan: Have edited my answer. Try it out. –  paddy Jul 31 '12 at 0:09

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