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I'm new to decorators and maybe this is biting off more than I can chew for a first decorator project, but what I want to do is make a parallel decorator that takes a function that looks like it humbly applies to a single argument, and automatically distributes it with multiprocessing and turns it into a function that applies to a list of arguments.

I am following up on this very helpful answer to an earlier question, so I can successfully pickle class instance methods and I can get examples like the answer there to work just fine.

This is my first attempt at a parallel decorator (after consulting some web hits for threading decorators).

###########
# Imports #
###########
import types, copy_reg, multiprocessing as mp
import pandas, numpy as np
### End Imports

##################
# Module methods #
##################

# Parallel decorator
def parallel(f):

    def executor(*args):
        _pool   = mp.Pool(2)
        _result = _pool.map_async(f, args[1:])
        # I used args[1:] because the input will be a
        # class instance method, so gotta skip over the self object.
        # but it seems like there ought to be a better way...

        _pool.close()
        _pool.join()
        return _result.get()
    return executor
### End parallel

def _pickle_method(method):
    func_name = method.im_func.__name__
    obj = method.im_self
    cls = method.im_class
    cls_name = ''
    if func_name.startswith('__') and not func_name.endswith('__'):
        cls_name = cls.__name__.lstrip('_')
    if cls_name:
        func_name = '_' + cls_name + func_name
    return _unpickle_method, (func_name, obj, cls)
### End _pickle_method

def _unpickle_method(func_name, obj, cls):
    for cls in cls.mro():
        try:
            func = cls.__dict__[func_name]
        except KeyError:
            pass
        else:
            break
    return func.__get__(obj, cls)
### End _unpickle_method

# This call to copy_reg.pickle allows you to pass methods as the first arg to
# mp.Pool methods. If you comment out this line, `pool.map(self.foo, ...)` results in
# PicklingError: Can't pickle <type 'instancemethod'>: attribute lookup
# __builtin__.instancemethod failed
copy_reg.pickle(types.MethodType, _pickle_method, _unpickle_method)
copy_reg.pickle(types.FunctionType, _pickle_method, _unpickle_method)
### End Module methods


##################
# Module classes #
##################
class Foo(object):


    def __init__(self, args):
        self.my_args = args
    ### End __init__

    def squareArg(self, arg):
        return arg**2
    ### End squareArg

    def par_squareArg(self):
        p = mp.Pool(2) # Replace 2 with the number of processors.
        q = p.map_async(self.squareArg, self.my_args)

        p.close()
        p.join()

        return q.get()
    ### End par_SquarArg

    @parallel
    def parSquare(self, num):
        return self.squareArg(num)
    ### End parSquare
### End Foo
### End Module classes


###########
# Testing #
###########
if __name__ == "__main__":

    myfoo = Foo([1,2,3,4])
    print myfoo.par_squareArg()
    print myfoo.parSquare(myfoo.my_args)

### End Testing

But when I use this approach (with the silly attempt to strong arm pickling functions with the same _pickle_method and _unpickle_method) I get an error first saying, AttributeError: 'function' object has no attribute 'im_func' but more generally the error says that functions can't be pickled.

So the question is twofold. (1) How could I modify the decorator so that if the f object it takes is an instance method of a class, then the executor it returns is also an instance method of that class object (so that this business about not being able to pickle does not happen, since I can pickle those instance methods)? and (2) Is it better to create addiitional _pickle_function and _unpickle_function methods? I thought Python could pickle module-level functions, so if my code doesn't result in executor becoming an instance method, it seems like it should be a module level function then, but then why can't it be pickled?

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2 Answers 2

(1) How could I modify the decorator so that if the f object it takes is an instance method of a class, then the executor it returns is also an instance method of that class object (so that this business about not being able to pickle does not happen, since I can pickle those instance methods)?

>>> myfoo.parSquare
<bound method Foo.executor of <__main__.Foo object at 0x101332510>>

As you can see parSquare is actually executor which has become an instance method, this is no surprise, since decorators are sort of function wrappers ...

Understanding Python decorators probably has the best description of decorators.

(2) Is it better to create addiitional _pickle_function and _unpickle_function methods?

you don't need to python already support them, as a matter of fact this copy_reg.pickle(types.FunctionType, _pickle_method, _unpickle_method) seems a bit strange since you are using the same algorithm to pickle both types.

Now the bigger questions is why are we getting PicklingError: Can't pickle <type 'function'>: attribute lookup __builtin__.function failed the error itself seems some what vague but it looks like it failed to lookup something, our function?
I think whats going on is that the decorator is overriding the function with one that was defined internally in your case parSquare becomes executor but executor is an internal function to parallel as such it isn't importable hence the lookup seems to be failing, this is just a hunch.

lets try a simpler example.

>>> def parallel(function):                        
...     def apply(values):
...         from multiprocessing import Pool
...         pool = Pool(4)
...         result = pool.map(function, values)
...         pool.close()
...         pool.join()
...         return result    
...     return apply
... 
>>> @parallel
... def square(value):
...     return value**2
... 
>>> 
>>> square([1,2,3,4])
Exception in thread Thread-1:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.6/lib/python2.6/threading.py", line 522, in __bootstrap_inner
    self.run()
  File "/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.6/lib/python2.6/threading.py", line 477, in run
    self.__target(*self.__args, **self.__kwargs)
  File "/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.6/lib/python2.6/multiprocessing/pool.py", line 225, in _handle_tasks
    put(task)
PicklingError: Can't pickle <type 'function'>: attribute lookup __builtin__.function failed

pretty much the same error we were getting.
note that the above code is equivalent to:

def parallel(function):                        
    def apply(values):
        from multiprocessing import Pool
        pool = Pool(4)
        result = pool.map(function, values)
        pool.close()
        pool.join()
        return result    
    return apply    

def square(value):
    return value**2

square = parallel(square)

which produces the same error, also note that if we don't rename our functions.

>>> def parallel(function):                        
...     def apply(values):
...         from multiprocessing import Pool
...         pool = Pool(4)
...         result = pool.map(function, values)
...         pool.close()
...         pool.join()
...         return result    
...     return apply    
... 
>>> def _square(value):
...     return value**2
... 
>>> square = parallel(_square)
>>> square([1,2,3,4])
[1, 4, 9, 16]
>>>

it works just fine, I've being looking for a way to control the way decorators work with names, but to no avail, I still want to use them with multiprocessing, so I came up with a somewhat ugly work around:

>>> def parallel(function):                
...     def temp(_):    
...         def apply(values):
...             from multiprocessing import Pool
...             pool = Pool(4)
...             result = pool.map(function, values)
...             pool.close()
...             pool.join()
...             return result    
...         return apply
...     return temp
... 
>>> def _square(value):
...     return value*value    
... 
>>> @parallel(_square)
... def square(values):
...     pass 
... 
>>> square([1,2,3,4])
[1, 4, 9, 16]
>>>

so basically I passed the real function to the decorator then I used a second function to deal with the values, as you can see it works just fine.

I've slightly modify your initial code to better handle the decorator, though it isn't perfect.

import types, copy_reg, multiprocessing as mp

def parallel(f):    
    def executor(*args):
        _pool   = mp.Pool(2)
        func = getattr(args[0], f.__name__) # This will get the actual method function so we can use our own pickling procedure
        _result = _pool.map(func, args[1])
        _pool.close()
        _pool.join()
        return _result
    return executor

def _pickle_method(method):
    func_name = method.im_func.__name__
    obj = method.im_self
    cls = method.im_class
    cls_name = ''
    if func_name.startswith('__') and not func_name.endswith('__'):
        cls_name = cls.__name__.lstrip('_')
    if cls_name:
        func_name = '_' + cls_name + func_name
    return _unpickle_method, (func_name, obj, cls)

def _unpickle_method(func_name, obj, cls):
    func = None
    for cls in cls.mro():        
        if func_name in cls.__dict__:
            func = cls.__dict__[func_name] # This will fail with the decorator, since parSquare is being wrapped around as executor             
            break
        else:
            for attr in dir(cls):
                prop = getattr(cls, attr)                
                if hasattr(prop, '__call__') and prop.__name__ == func_name:
                    func = cls.__dict__[attr]
                    break
    if func == None:
        raise KeyError("Couldn't find function %s withing %s" % (str(func_name), str(cls)))        
    return func.__get__(obj, cls)

copy_reg.pickle(types.MethodType, _pickle_method, _unpickle_method)

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self, args):
        self.my_args = args
    def squareArg(self, arg):
        return arg**2
    def par_squareArg(self):
        p = mp.Pool(2) # Replace 2 with the number of processors.
        q = p.map(self.squareArg, self.my_args)
        p.close()
        p.join()
        return q    
    @parallel
    def parSquare(self, num):
        return self.squareArg(num)  

if __name__ == "__main__":
    myfoo = Foo([1,2,3,4])
    print myfoo.par_squareArg()
    print myfoo.parSquare(myfoo.my_args)  

fundamentally this still fails, giving us AssertionError: daemonic processes are not allowed to have children since the subprocess tries to call the function, keep in mind that subprocess don't really copy the code simply the names ...

one work around is similar to the one I mentioned previously:

import types, copy_reg, multiprocessing as mp

def parallel(f):    
    def temp(_):
        def executor(*args):
            _pool   = mp.Pool(2)
            func = getattr(args[0], f.__name__) # This will get the actual method function so we can use our own pickling procedure
            _result = _pool.map(func, args[1])
            _pool.close()
            _pool.join()
            return _result        
        return executor
    return temp

def _pickle_method(method):
    func_name = method.im_func.__name__
    obj = method.im_self
    cls = method.im_class
    cls_name = ''
    if func_name.startswith('__') and not func_name.endswith('__'):
        cls_name = cls.__name__.lstrip('_')
    if cls_name:
        func_name = '_' + cls_name + func_name
    return _unpickle_method, (func_name, obj, cls)

def _unpickle_method(func_name, obj, cls):
    func = None
    for cls in cls.mro():        
        if func_name in cls.__dict__:
            func = cls.__dict__[func_name] # This will fail with the decorator, since parSquare is being wrapped around as executor             
            break
        else:
            for attr in dir(cls):
                prop = getattr(cls, attr)                
                if hasattr(prop, '__call__') and prop.__name__ == func_name:
                    func = cls.__dict__[attr]
                    break
    if func == None:
        raise KeyError("Couldn't find function %s withing %s" % (str(func_name), str(cls)))        
    return func.__get__(obj, cls)

copy_reg.pickle(types.MethodType, _pickle_method, _unpickle_method)

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self, args):
        self.my_args = args
    def squareArg(self, arg):
        return arg**2
    def par_squareArg(self):
        p = mp.Pool(2) # Replace 2 with the number of processors.
        q = p.map(self.squareArg, self.my_args)
        p.close()
        p.join()
        return q
    def _parSquare(self, num):    
        return self.squareArg(num)
    @parallel(_parSquare)
    def parSquare(self, num):
        pass    


if __name__ == "__main__":
    myfoo = Foo([1,2,3,4])
    print myfoo.par_squareArg()
    print myfoo.parSquare(myfoo.my_args)

[1, 4, 9, 16]
[1, 4, 9, 16]

One last thing, be very careful when multithreading, depending on how you segment your data you can actually have a slower time multithreaded than single threaded, mainly due to the overhead of copying values back and forth as well creating and destroying subprocess.

Always benchmark single/multithreaded and properly segment your data when possible.

case in point:

import numpy
import time
from multiprocessing import Pool

def square(value):
    return value*value

if __name__ == '__main__':
    pool = Pool(5)
    values = range(1000000)
    start = time.time()
    _ = pool.map(square, values)
    pool.close()
    pool.join()
    end = time.time()

    print "multithreaded time %f" % (end - start)
    start = time.time()
    _ = map(square, values)
    end = time.time()
    print "single threaded time %f" % (end - start)

    start = time.time()
    _ = numpy.asarray(values)**2
    end = time.time()
    print "numpy time %f" % (end - start)

    v = numpy.asarray(values)
    start = time.time()
    _ = v**2
    end = time.time()
    print "numpy without pre-initialization %f" % (end - start)

gives us:

multithreaded time 0.484441
single threaded time 0.196421
numpy time 0.184163
numpy without pre-initialization 0.004490
share|improve this answer
    
There are a number of issues with your response, but I appreciate the effort. First, I am very familiar with multithreading and multiprocessing in Python. I would prefer to use mpi4py in this case, but due to existing project constraints, I don't think it will be a good solution. The regular multiprocessing module will be OK, and the timing is in favor of doing it. The simplistic example with squaring a number was just for demo purposes to understand this problem better. I would not do trivial algorithms in parallel like that; I would move them to the GPU or something else low overhead. –  EMS Jul 31 '12 at 11:46
    
Second, the Daemon process error using Pool is totally unrelated to this issue. I have enocuntered that problem before, and I usually just subclass Pool and make non-Daemon instances. That issue ostensibly has nothing to do with the decorator problem. Similarly, most of your examples are also unhelpful because my case is specifically about decorating a class instance method, so that the parallel decoration happens within a class. The fact that executor prints as a member function of Foo doesn't tell the whole story... because if that were true, then pickling it would not be a problem. –  EMS Jul 31 '12 at 11:48
    
The other example I gave in my problem, as well as the link to the previous question, both directly deal with this class instance pickling, which works just fine without the decorator. So it's not just a more general issue with the pickling... it's an issue how to get the decorator to essentially leave the function as-is but just wrap parallel stuff around it, as opposed to extracting it as a standalone function. I will take a closer look at the unusual naming conventions in the latter solutions you posted. –  EMS Jul 31 '12 at 11:50
    
@EMS gpu doesn't have low overhead on the contrary it has a higher overhead since you need to move things from regular memory to video memory and back, but the shear nunber of engines out weight this, the daemon process error is due to the fact that the decorator is being called again in the sub process, restarting the whole thing, it has to do with the way decorators are created and how subprocess are initialized, remember multiprocessing shares nothing, it copies values back and forth, and it pickles the function name, not its code. –  Samy Vilar Jul 31 '12 at 19:10
    
@EMS the simpler demo, is just away to understand what was going on without dealing with the complexities of the original code, which is why I made sure that it reproduced the same error, its also meant for others that may try to the same without dealing with the class issues, either way this was a great idea, even if it did take several hours to fully understand what was happening. –  Samy Vilar Jul 31 '12 at 19:14

Well, this isn't the answer you're looking for, but Sage has an @parallel decorator along the lines of what you're looking for. You can find the documentation and source code online.

As a general rule, though, add import pdb;pdb.set_trace() just before the line you see failing and inspect all the objects in sight. If you're using ipython you can just use the %pdb magic command or do something along these lines.

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