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I know of 2 ways to implement the singleton pattern in java and im wondering which one is better and why.

the first way is:

  1. declare the constructor of the class private
  2. have everything inside the class static - basiclly have the class instance itself be the singleton

second way is:

  1. declare the constructor of the class private
  2. have a static member to hold the singleton (which may be an instance of the class)
  3. have a static getInstance() method

I tend to think that even though the second approach is the most common, the first approach may produce better code readability, both approaches seem similiarly efficient in runtime complexity, so i dont really get the reasons behind why the second approach is way more common and considered better practice...

enlighten me!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first approach is not a singleton. A singleton is a class of which precisely one instance, no more, no less, can exist. The first thing is sometimes called a "static class", a "utility class," or an "uninstantiable class."

There are a number of things that you can do with a "real" singleton that you can't do with a utility class. For example, you can have a singleton that implements an interface or extends another class; you can't do that with the all-static-methods thing. The all-static-methods class is generally evidence that no object oriented design analysis was done

As far as how many ways there are to implement the singleton pattern in Java, there are actually quite a number of interesting ways, using different language features to defer initialization until absolutely needed: class loading, enumerations, or just a synchronized block and an if.

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you can acheive the same functionality using the class instance itself with static methods, can you not? –  Ofek Ron Jul 31 '12 at 1:08
4  
No, you can't. You can have a singleton that implements an interface or extends another class -- you can't do that with the all-static-methods thing. The all-static-methods class is generally evidence that no object oriented design analysis was done. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jul 31 '12 at 1:10
1  
you should edit your answer and add this comment to it, you gave me a good reason why second approach makes more sense –  Ofek Ron Jul 31 '12 at 1:12
    
@OfekRon -- OK, done! –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jul 31 '12 at 2:14

Well there are few interesting ways to implement singleton pattern. Let me recollect few of those implementations which i have read about:

  1. The second approach you have mentioned in your question. (Not thread safe)
  2. When you developing multithreaded applications you may have to use a lock (simple thread safety)

    public sealed class Singleton { static Singleton instance=null; static readonly object padlock = new object();

    Singleton()
    {
    }
    
    public static Singleton Instance
    {
        get
        {
            lock (padlock)
            {
                if (instance==null)
                {
                    instance = new Singleton();
                }
                return instance;
            }
        }
    }
    

    }

  3. Double check locking

    public sealed class Singleton { static Singleton instance=null; static readonly object padlock = new object();

    Singleton()
    {
    }
    
    public static Singleton Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (instance==null)
            {
                lock (padlock)
                {
                    if (instance==null)
                    {
                        instance = new Singleton();
                    }
                }
            }
            return instance;
        }
    }
    

    }

  4. Not lazy, but thread-safe without using locks

    public sealed class Singleton { static readonly Singleton instance=new Singleton();

    // Explicit static constructor to tell C# compiler
    // not to mark type as beforefieldinit
    static Singleton()
    {
    }
    
    Singleton()
    {
    }
    
    public static Singleton Instance
    {
        get
        {
            return instance;
        }
    }
    

    }

  5. Fully Lazy Initialization

    public sealed class Singleton { Singleton() { }

    public static Singleton Instance
    {
        get
        {
            return Nested.instance;
        }
    }
    
    class Nested
    {
        // Explicit static constructor to tell C# compiler
        // not to mark type as beforefieldinit
        static Nested()
        {
        }
    
        internal static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton();
    }
    

    }

The third approach wont work in java.Becos Java memory model doesn't ensure that the constructor completes before the reference to the new object is assigned to instance.

Hope this helps you.

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1  
this is C# i was asking about java... –  Ofek Ron Jul 31 '12 at 9:40
    
All these can be implemented in java as well, as it is a design pattern.. design patterns are not bound to any language!! as long as it is an OO program language, it can be applied.. –  Vinoth Jul 31 '12 at 9:42

Advantages to the object-based singleton

  1. Will your "singleton" ever, under any possibly non-imaginable circumstances, become a non-singleton? Perhaps you'll want per-thread, per-connection, or some other categorization? Door #2 leaves you with a future, without having to rewrite code.

  2. You may have a singleton, but do you have only one implementation of that singleton? A common pattern is to have a factory method look at the runtime environment and make a determination as to which implementation of the "service" being offered by the singleton is appropriate. The commons-logging LogFactory is example of this type of singleton.

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say im pretty sure that it is to be a singleton –  Ofek Ron Jul 31 '12 at 1:09
1  
say im pretty sure everyone changes their mind in a few days/weeks/years :-) –  Richard Sitze Jul 31 '12 at 1:10

Testability of other classes that use the singleton is hampered by static methods. With an instance you can substitute a mock object or other forms of test double.

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If I get your question, right.

Why is this #2

public class MySingleton {

  static private MySingleton instance=new MySingleton();

  private MySingleton() {}

  static public MySingleton getInstance() { return instance; }

}

better than #1

...Sorry I don't get the first point... -> Actually reading from other comments I got it. I confirm, having static methods doesn't mean you have a singleton. So the comparison is not even fair ;-/

Whatever it is, the reason why #2 is better is because of multi-threading.When the singleton is initialized from a static initializer, the jvm makes sure only one thread instantiates the class.

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I wonder why this got down voted –  Olivier Refalo Jul 31 '12 at 2:27

Perhaps consider implementing a singleton using an enum:

public enum Singleton {
INSTANCE;

public void doStuff() {
    System.out.println("Whoopee");
}
}

and call it like Singleton.INSTANCE.doStuff()

This is recommended in the book Effective Java by Josh Bloch

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im more into code readabilty then making my program run 1/1000 nano seconds faster... –  Ofek Ron Jul 31 '12 at 1:13
    
@OfekRon good point. In that case, my opinion is that your first case has the least bloat and would be the easiest to read –  Beefyhalo Jul 31 '12 at 1:15
    
Correct, for the trade off of some readability, you get the nice OO benefits from not using static. Java enum types are able to inherit interfaces and also gain from the OO benefit. Effectively, they are the same –  Beefyhalo Jul 31 '12 at 1:22

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