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I am new to perl. when i m trying to print the values of the array along with one variable in the while loop, the variable is printing in the new line.

while($line=<FH>)
{
    chomp($line);
    $tem = grep(/gooty/,$line);
    if($tem==1)
    {
        $Date=$date;
        @array=split(/\|/,$line);
        $sth = "INSERT INTO TABLE VALUES $array[1],$array[2],$date \n";
    }
}
print "$sth \n";

the output:

INSERT INTO TABLE VALUES alan ,777  
,2012-07-31

instead i want the output as :

INSERT INTO TABLE VALUES alan ,777,2012-07-31

in single line

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4 Answers

This is a common problem for new perl programmers. Say

while (defined($line = <FH>))
{
    chomp $line; # Eliminate terminating newline if there
    ...

If the results are still not right, you may be trying to read a text file with MSDOS/Windows line endings using a version of Perl (like Cygwin) that doesn't handle them correctly. This can cause chomp to malfunction. You can work around the problem using this instead:

$line =~ s/[\r\n]+$//;

This cleans all end-of-line characters from the end of the line, no matter how many there are.,

Additional notes on your code: You'll save lots of trouble for yourself with use strict; and use warnings;, which will require variable declarations with my and our. You don't need to call grep. Just say if ($line =~ /gooty/) {. If there is any chance of extra whitespace in your data, a better split pattern is \s+\|\s+. This will consume whitespace around the vertical bar field separators. In that case you also want to use

$line =~ s/\s+$//; 

instead of chomp $line. This will clean all whitespace from the end of line, which includes end-of-line characters.

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while(defined($line = <FH>)) –  gaussblurinc Jul 31 '12 at 12:54
    
You're right, though in this case a blank line is an error, dropping out prematurely is maybe not such a bad outcome. –  Gene Jul 31 '12 at 13:16
    
yeah, it is another Perl feature, that will not be implemented in this situation (maybe). it is for knowledge –  gaussblurinc Jul 31 '12 at 13:20
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You have a newline at the end of $line. chomp it, before splitting it, to get the desired output.

chomp $line;

perldoc -f chomp

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I did that already, but it still printing in the new line. :( –  user958719 Jul 31 '12 at 1:32
1  
Note I edited my answer to account for what is probably wrong. –  Gene Jul 31 '12 at 1:55
    
Thank you for letting me know. ++ :-) –  Alan Haggai Alavi Jul 31 '12 at 1:57
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I assume that you don't want your elements of @array enclosed by whitespace characters. Then we should trim them before printing them.

my $line = <FH>;

my $date = '2012-07-31'; # or whatever

if($line =~ /gooty/)
{
    my @array = split /[|]/, $line;
    foreach (@array) {
      s/^\s+//; # removes leading  whitespaces
      s/\s+$//; # removes trailing whitespaces
    }
    print "INSERT INTO TABLE VALUES $array[1],$array[2],$date \n";
}

This should print the desired output.

But I cannot be sure until you show us the input you gave your code that produced the unexpected output. (Or could it be that you modify your $sth between the loop and the print statement? I see you appended two newlines?)

Btw: use strict; use warnings!

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The cleanest approach, instead of using chomp, is to remove all trailing whitespace from the end of the line

Start your loop with

$line =~ s/\s+\z//;
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