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Instead of running a code in a Initialize() method for example, i want to just write a line, something like somecode.run() and it will run everything for me, allowing me to write all the code in a different location for the sake of organization.

I want the code to act like it was in that spot though, so i have access to privates etc.

whats the best way to do this?

edit to clarify:

Here is an example

public class game
{
    public void Initialize()
    { 
     I want to run some code here but I don't want to write it here, 
     I want to write it in another file for the sake of organization,
     and just  reference it somehow here, but yet still be able to use the
     privates as if it was in this spot
    }
}
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1  
So you want something like a normal method call, living in a different file, but you want that method to have access to all the local variables at the call site? –  Kirk Woll Jul 31 '12 at 2:56
    
I must be missing something, run in a different working directory? A different config file or ?? –  kenny Jul 31 '12 at 2:56
    
Can you give a minimal example of the code you want to refactor? –  Blorgbeard Jul 31 '12 at 2:57
    
Are you familiar with partial classes? Seems like that might help. –  Blorgbeard Jul 31 '12 at 3:10
    
I edited to clarify. Partial classes is not really what I'm looking for, unless it can do what I described and I don't think it can. –  Blaz Art Jul 31 '12 at 3:13
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Partial classes and methods should be able to do what you're talking about (MS Documentation http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/wa80x488.aspx).

I'm not sure why you'd need to do anything more complex than what's defined in the MSDN document. You can use virtuals to allow for overrides and call the base function, to call the original implementation. There's a proper way to use inheritance to allow a lot of "tweaking" at the proper levels, but the initial partial classes and methods should allow you to do the basic format.

You normally see examples of partials in code that's pre-written (for instance in LINQ by the DataContext).

//auto-generated (or half implemented) code
public partial User
{
    public partial void OnFirstNameChanged();

    private string _FirstName = "";
    public string FirstName
    {
        get
        {
            return _FirstName;
        }
        set
        {
            _FirstName = value;
            OnFirstNameChanged();
        }
    }
}

//MyCustomStuff.cs
public partial User
{
    public partial void OnFirstNameChanged()
    {
        Console.Write(string.Format("Your name is {0}", FirstName));
    }
}
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The only way to do what you want is to use partial classes. Something like the following:-

// In file: game1.cs
public partial class game
{
    private int Value;

    public void Initialize()
    {
        Run();
    }
}


// In file: game2.cs
public partial class game
{
    private void Run()
    {
        Value = 2;  // Access private field.
    }
}

Edit: You mentioned that you don't want to use partial classes unless it meets your requirements. I think that it is the only way to meet your requirements since one of your requirements is for the new method to be able to access private members of the original class.

The only possible situation where partial classes may not meet your requirements is if you also want the method to access your local variables. But then you could just pass those local variables through the parameters of that new method.

Having said all these, I personally discourage the use of partial classes since it's not normally considered a good practice. That means that you will need to change your requirements if you want to do it in a different way.

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