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A^2+B^2+C^2+D^2 = N Given an integer N, print out all possible combinations of integer values of ABCD which solve the equation.

I am guessing we can do better than brute force.

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4  
See this article on Wikipedia, and related articles. –  nhahtdh Jul 31 '12 at 3:25
    
This will most likely entail a dynamic programming solution or heuristic. –  David Titarenco Jul 31 '12 at 3:25
2  
The Wikipedia article has no information on how to enumerate all solutions to the four-square problem (it primarily talks about the mathematical proof of the related conjecture). It does reference an article by Rabin and Shallit, however, that article only discusses how to find a single solution, not how to enumerate all possible solutions. additionally, that article is not online, but is a paid download. –  RBarryYoung Jul 31 '12 at 3:40
    
@RBarryYoung: That's why it is a comment - just for more information on the property of the sum of 4 squares. –  nhahtdh Jul 31 '12 at 4:01
1  
Follow Up: I posted on the CS forum, here(cs.stackexchange.com/questions/2988/…). It seems that the theoretical fastest this can be done is O(N*Log(Log(N))), and the c# method that I posted there does seem to acheive this. –  RBarryYoung Aug 7 '12 at 15:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The Wikipedia page has some interesting background information, but Lagrange's four-square theorem (or, more correctly, Bachet's Theorem - Lagrange only proved it) doesn't really go into detail on how to find said squares.

As I said in my comment, the solution is going to be nontrivial. This paper discusses the solvability of four-square sums. The paper alleges that:

There is no convenient algorithm (beyond the simple one mentioned in the second paragraph of this paper) for finding additional solutions that are indicated by the calculation of representations, but perhaps this will streamline the search by giving an idea of what kinds of solutions do and do not exist.

There are a few other interesting facts related to this topic. There exist other theorems that state that every integer can be written as a sum of four particular multiples of squares. For example, every integer can be written as N = a^2 + 2b^2 + 4c^2 + 14d^2. There are 54 cases like this that are true for all integers, and Ramanujan provided the complete list in the year 1917.

For more information, see Modular Forms. This is not easy to understand unless you have some background in number theory. If you could generalize Ramanujan's 54 forms, you may have an easier time with this. With that said, in the first paper I cite, there is a small snippet which discusses an algorithm that may find every solution (even though I find it a bit hard to follow):

For example, it was reported in 1911 that the calculator Gottfried Ruckle was asked to reduce N = 15663 as a sum of four squares. He produced a solution of 125^2 + 6^2 + 1^2 + 1^2 in 8 seconds, followed immediately by 125^2 + 5^2 + 3^2 + 2^2. A more difficult problem (reflected by a first term that is farther from the original number, with correspondingly larger later terms) took 56 seconds: 11399 = 105^2 + 15^2 + 8^2 + 5^2. In general, the strategy is to begin by setting the first term to be the largest square below N and try to represent the smaller remainder as a sum of three squares. Then the first term is set to the next largest square below N, and so forth. Over time a lightning calculator would become familiar with expressing small numbers as sums of squares, which would speed up the process.

(Emphasis mine.)

The algorithm is described as being recursive, but it could easily be implemented iteratively.

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1  
+1: nice research. The last sentence if the second quotation, actually also highlights how dynamic programming could be applied to enhance the naive algorithm. –  RBarryYoung Jul 31 '12 at 15:07

Naive brute force would be something like:

n = 3200724;
lim = sqrt (n) + 1;
for (a = 0; a <= lim; a++)
    for (b = 0; b <= lim; b++)
        for (c = 0; c <= lim; c++)
            for (d = 0; d <= lim; d++)
                if (a * a + b * b + c * c + d * d == n)
                    printf ("%d %d %d %d\n", a, b, c, d);

Unfortunately, this will result in over a trillion loops, not overly efficient.

You can actually do substantially better than that by discounting huge numbers of impossibilities at each level, with something like:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int n = atoi (argv[1]);
    int a, b, c, d, na, nb, nc, nd;
    int count = 0;

    for (a = 0, na = n; a * a <= na; a++) {
        for (b = 0, nb = na - a * a; b * b <= nb; b++) {
            for (c = 0, nc = nb - b * b; c * c <= nc; c++) {
                for (d = 0, nd = nc - c * c; d * d <= nd; d++) {
                    if (d * d == nd) {
                        printf ("%d %d %d %d\n", a, b, c, d);
                        count++;
                    }
                    tot++;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    printf ("Found %d solutions\n", count);

    return 0;
}

It's still brute force, but not quite as brutish inasmuch as it understands when to stop each level of looping as early as possible.

On my (relatively) modest box, that takes under a second (a) to get all solutions for numbers up to 50,000. Beyond that, it starts taking more time:

     n          time taken
----------      ----------
   100,000            3.7s
 1,000,000       6m, 18.7s

For n = ten million, it had been going about an hour and a half before I killed it.

So, I would say brute force is perfectly acceptable up to a point. Beyond that, more mathematical solutions would be needed.


For even more efficiency, you could only check those solutions where d >= c >= b >= a. That's because you could then build up all the solutions from those combinations into permutations (with potential duplicate removal where the values of two or more of a, b, c, or d are identical).

In addition, the body of the d loop doesn't need to check every value of d, just the last possible one.

Getting the results for 1,000,000 in that case takes under ten seconds rather than over six minutes:

   0    0    0 1000
   0    0  280  960
   0    0  352  936
   0    0  600  800
   0   24  640  768
   :    :    :    :
 424  512  512  544
 428  460  500  596
 432  440  480  624
 436  476  532  548
 444  468  468  604
 448  464  520  560
 452  452  476  604
 452  484  484  572
 500  500  500  500
Found 1302 solutions

real   0m9.517s
user   0m9.505s
sys    0m0.012s

That code follows:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int n = atoi (argv[1]);
    int a, b, c, d, na, nb, nc, nd;
    int count = 0;

    for (a = 0, na = n; a * a <= na; a++) {
        for (b = a, nb = na - a * a; b * b <= nb; b++) {
            for (c = b, nc = nb - b * b; c * c <= nc; c++) {
                for (d = c, nd = nc - c * c; d * d < nd; d++);
                if (d * d == nd) {
                    printf ("%4d %4d %4d %4d\n", a, b, c, d);
                    count++;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    printf ("Found %d solutions\n", count);

    return 0;
}

And, as per a suggestion by DSM, the d loop can disappear altogether (since there's only one possible value of d (discounting negative numbers) and it can be calculated), which brings the one million case down to two seconds for me, and the ten million case to a far more manageable 68 seconds.

That version is as follows:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int n = atoi (argv[1]);
    int a, b, c, d, na, nb, nc, nd;
    int count = 0;

    for (a = 0, na = n; a * a <= na; a++) {
        for (b = a, nb = na - a * a; b * b <= nb; b++) {
            for (c = b, nc = nb - b * b; c * c <= nc; c++) {
                nd = nc - c * c;
                d = sqrt (nd);
                if (d * d == nd) {
                    printf ("%d %d %d %d\n", a, b, c, d);
                    count++;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    printf ("Found %d solutions\n", count);

    return 0;
}

(a): All timings are done with the inner printf commented out so that I/O doesn't skew the figures.

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You can improve brute force still further: the inner loop over d is unneeded (there's only one d which will work, after all), and you can impose an order on the terms (say increasing) so you only have to consider each multiset once rather than each permutation. [You do have to check to see which terms are equal to get the right number to add, of course.] This brought the 10^6 case down to 0.9s for me and the 10^7 case down to 28s. –  DSM Jul 31 '12 at 6:44
    
Good ideas, @DSM, I'd incorporated one of them in a previous edit but the calculation to get d was the real improvement. –  paxdiablo Jul 31 '12 at 6:56
1  
I found that I needed to check that d >= c, otherwise I got some duplicate solutions. I was coding in Java, so my code might not have been identical to yours. –  rossum Jul 31 '12 at 12:43

It seems as though all integers can be made by such a combination:

0 = 0^2 + 0^2 + 0^2 + 0^2
1 = 1^2 + 0^2 + 0^2 + 0^2
2 = 1^2 + 1^2 + 0^2 + 0^2
3 = 1^2 + 1^2 + 1^2 + 0^2
4 = 2^2 + 0^2 + 0^2 + 0^2, 1^2 + 1^2 + 1^2 + 1^2 + 1^2
5 = 2^2 + 1^2 + 0^2 + 0^2
6 = 2^2 + 1^2 + 1^2 + 0^2
7 = 2^2 + 1^2 + 1^2 + 1^2
8 = 2^2 + 2^2 + 0^2 + 0^2
9 = 3^2 + 0^2 + 0^2 + 0^2, 2^2 + 2^2 + 1^2 + 0^2
10 = 3^2 + 1^2 + 0^2 + 0^2, 2^2 + 2^2 + 1^2 + 1^2
11 = 3^2 + 1^2 + 1^2 + 0^2
12 = 3^2 + 1^2 + 1^2 + 1^2, 2^2 + 2^2 + 2^2 + 0^2
.
.
.

and so forth

As I did some initial working in my head, I thought that it would be only the perfect squares that had more than 1 possible solution. However after listing them out it seems to me there is no obvious order to them. However, I thought of an algorithm I think is most appropriate for this situation:

The important thing is to use a 4-tuple (a, b, c, d). In any given 4-tuple which is a solution to a^2 + b^2 + c^2 + d^2 = n, we will set ourselves a constraint that a is always the largest of the 4, b is next, and so on and so forth like:

a >= b >= c >= d

Also note that a^2 cannot be less than n/4, otherwise the sum of the squares will have to be less than n.

Then the algorithm is:

1a. Obtain floor(square_root(n)) # this is the maximum value of a - call it max_a
1b. Obtain the first value of a such that a^2 >= n/4 - call it min_a
2. For a in a range (min_a, max_a)

At this point we have selected a particular a, and are now looking at bridging the gap from a^2 to n - i.e. (n - a^2)

3. Repeat steps 1a through 2 to select a value of b. This time instead of finding
floor(square_root(n)) we find floor(square_root(n - a^2))

and so on and so forth. So the entire algorithm would look something like:

1a. Obtain floor(square_root(n)) # this is the maximum value of a - call it max_a
1b. Obtain the first value of a such that a^2 >= n/4 - call it min_a
2. For a in a range (min_a, max_a)
3a. Obtain floor(square_root(n - a^2))
3b. Obtain the first value of b such that b^2 >= (n - a^2)/3
4. For b in a range (min_b, max_b)
5a. Obtain floor(square_root(n - a^2 - b^2))
5b. Obtain the first value of b such that b^2 >= (n - a^2 - b^2)/2
6. For c in a range (min_c, max_c)
7. We now look at (n - a^2 - b^2 - c^2). If its square root is an integer, this is d.
Otherwise, this tuple will not form a solution

At steps 3b and 5b I use (n - a^2)/3, (n - a^2 - b^2)/2. We divide by 3 or 2, respectively, because of the number of values in the tuple not yet 'fixed'.

An example:

doing this on n = 12:

1a. max_a = 3
1b. min_a = 2
2. for a in range(2, 3):
    use a = 2
3a. we now look at (12 - 2^2) = 8
max_b = 2
3b. min_b = 2
4. b must be 2
5a. we now look at (12 - 2^2 - 2^2) = 4
max_c = 2
5b. min_c = 2
6. c must be 2
7. (n - a^2 - b^2 - c^2) = 0, hence d = 0
so a possible tuple is (2, 2, 2, 0)

2. use a = 3
3a. we now look at (12 - 3^2) = 3
max_b = 1
3b. min_b = 1
4. b must be 1
5a. we now look at (12 - 3^2 - 1^2) = 2
max_c = 1
5b. min_c = 1
6. c must be 1
7. (n - a^2 - b^2 - c^2) = 1, hence d = 1
so a possible tuple is (3, 1, 1, 1)

These are the only two possible tuples - hey presto!

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The four square problem always has a solution. –  Alexandre C. Jul 31 '12 at 7:05
    
This is true - however so others know, the question has been edited since it was asked and when it was asked, it had a now-removed tag of "interview-questions". Inside of an interview one would not be able to use Google to determine this, so I have included in my solution some working steps that led me to such a hypothesis using intuition. Which after all is what an interview would be testing. –  nebffa Jul 31 '12 at 14:00

nebffa has a great answer. one suggestion:

 step 3a:  max_b = min(a, floor(square_root(n - a^2))) // since b <= a

max_c and max_d can be improved in the same way too.

Here is another try:

1. generate array S: {0, 1, 2^2, 3^2,.... nr^2} where nr = floor(square_root(N)). 

now the problem is to find 4 numbers from the array that sum(a, b,c,d) = N;

2. according to neffa's post (step 1a & 1b), a (which is the largest among all 4 numbers) is between [nr/2 .. nr]. 

We can loop a from nr down to nr/2 and calculate r = N - S[a]; now the question is to find 3 numbers from S the sum(b,c,d) = r = N -S[a];

here is code:

nr = square_root(N);
S = {0, 1, 2^2, 3^2, 4^2,.... nr^2};
for (a = nr; a >= nr/2; a--)
{
   r = N - S[a];
   // it is now a 3SUM problem
   for(b = a; b >= 0; b--)
   {
      r1 = r - S[b];
      if (r1 < 0) 
          continue;

      if (r1 > N/2) // because (a^2 + b^2) >= (c^2 + d^2)
          break;

      for (c = 0, d = b; c <= d;)
      {
          sum = S[c] + S[d];
          if (sum == r1) 
          {
               print a, b, c, d;
               c++; d--;
          }
          else if (sum < r1)
               c++;
          else
               d--;
      }
   }
}

runtime is O(sqare_root(N)^3).

Here is the test result running java on my VM (time in milliseconds, result# is total num of valid combination, time 1 with printout, time2 without printout):

N            result#  time1     time2
-----------  -------- --------  -----------
  1,000,000   1302       859       281
 10,000,000   6262     16109      7938
100,000,000  30912    442469    344359
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