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Is there a nicer way of doing the following:
I need a check for null to happen on file.Headers before proceeding with the loop

if (file.Headers != null)
{
  foreach (var h in file.Headers)
  {
   //set lots of properties & some other stuff
  }
}

In short it looks a bit ugly to write the foreach inside the if due to the level of indentation happening in my code.

Is something that would evaluate to

foreach(var h in (file.Headers != null))
{
  //do stuff
}

possible?

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3  
You can have a look here: stackoverflow.com/questions/6937407/… –  Adrian Faciu Jul 31 '12 at 6:34
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/872323/… is another idea. –  weismat Jul 31 '12 at 6:36
1  
@AdrianFaciu I think that's completely different. The question checks if the collection is null first before doing the for-each. Your link checks if the item in the collection is null. –  rikitikitik Jul 31 '12 at 6:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Just as a slight cosmetic addition to Rune's suggestion, you could create your own extension method:

public static IEnumerable<T> OrEmptyIfNull<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    return source ?? Enumerable.Empty<T>();
}

Then you can write:

foreach (var header in file.Headers.OrEmptyIfNull())
{
}

Change the name according to taste :)

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Assuming that the type of elements in file.Headers is T you could do this

foreach(var header in file.Headers ?? Enumerable.Empty<T>()){
  //do stuff
}

this will create an empty enumerable of T if file.Headers is null. If the type of file is a type you own I would however consider changing the getter of Headers instead. null is the value of unknown so if possible instead of using null as "I know there's no elements" when null actually(/originally) should be interpreted as "I don't know if there's any elements" use an empty set to show that you know there's no elements in the set. That would also be DRY'er since you won't have to do the null check as often.

EDIT as a follow up on Jons suggest you could also create an extension method changing the above code to

foreach(var header in file.Headers.OrEmptyIfNull()){
  //do stuff
}

In the case where you can't change the getter this would be my own preferred since it expresses the intention more clearly by giving the operation a name (OrEmptyIfNull)

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Frankly, I advise: just suck up the null test. A null test is just a brfalse or brfalse.s; everything else is going to involve much more work (tests, assignments, extra method calls, unnecessary GetEnumerator(), MoveNext(), Dispose() on the iterator, etc).

An if test is simple, obvious, and efficient.

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You do make an interesting point Marc, however, I'm currently looking to lessen the indentation levels of the code. But I will keep your comment in mind when I need to take note of performance. –  Eminem Jul 31 '12 at 6:54

the "if" before the iteration is fine, few of those "pretty" semantics can make your code less readable.

anyway, if the indentation disturbs your, you can change the if to check:

if(file.Headers == null)  
   return;

and you'll get to the foreach loop only when there is a true value at the headers property.

another option I can think about is using the null-coalescing operator inside your foreach loop and to completely avoid null checking. sample:

List<int> collection = new List<int>();
collection = null;
foreach (var i in collection ?? Enumerable.Empty<int>())
{
    //your code here
}

(replace the collection with your true object/type)

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Your first option will not work if there is any code outside the if statement. –  rikitikitik Jul 31 '12 at 6:41
    
I agree, the if statement is easy and cheap to implement compared to creating a new list, just for code beautification. –  Andreas Johansson Jul 31 '12 at 8:05

I am using a nice little extension method for these scenarios:

  public static class Extensions
  {
    public static IList<T> EnsureNotNull<T>(this IList<T> list)
    {
      return list ?? new List<T>();
    }
  }

Given that Headers is of type list, you can do following:

foreach(var h in (file.Headers.EnsureNotNull()))
{
  //do stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
you can use the ?? operator and shorten the return statement to return list ?? new List<T>; –  Rune FS Jul 31 '12 at 6:46
    
@wolfgangziegler, If I understand correctly the test for null in your sample file.Headers.EnsureNotNull() != null is not needed, and is even wrong? –  Remko Jansen Jul 31 '12 at 8:56

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