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I've got error C2078 in VC2010 when compiling the code below.

struct A
  {
  int foo;
  double bar;
  };

std::array<A, 2> a1 = 
  // error C2078: too many initializers
  {
    {0, 0.1},
    {2, 3.4}
  };

// OK
std::array<double, 2> a2 = {0.1, 2.3};

I found out that the correct syntax for a1 is

std::array<A, 2> a1 = 
  {{
    {0, 0.1},
    {2, 3.4}
  }};

The question is: why extra braces are required for a1 but not required for a2?

Update

The question seems to be not specific to std::array. Some examples:

struct B
  {
  int foo[2];
  };

// OK
B meow1 = {1,2};
B bark1 = {{1,2}};

struct C
  {
  struct 
    { 
    int a, b; 
    } foo;
  };

// OK
C meow2 = {1,2};
C bark2 = {{1,2}};

struct D
  {
  struct 
    { 
    int a, b; 
    } foo[2];
  };

D meow3 = {{1,2},{3,4}};  // error C2078: too many initializers
D bark3 = {{{1,2},{3,4}}};

I still don't see why struct D gives the error but B and C don't.

share|improve this question
1  
Try omitting the =. –  Kerrek SB Jul 31 '12 at 7:19
    
@KerrekSB: That will not work! See my answer to know the reason. –  Nawaz Jul 31 '12 at 7:29
1  
@KerrekSB: Because double is not an aggregate, while A is. In other words, std::array<double, 2> is an aggregate of aggregate, while std::array<A, 2> is an aggregate of aggregate of aggregate! –  Nawaz Jul 31 '12 at 7:37
1  
@Nawaz: A fully standard-conformant syntax for a2 is std::array<double, 2> a2 = {{0.1, 2.3}};, but I wonder too why it's allowed to omit one pair of braces. –  Andrey Jul 31 '12 at 7:52
1  
@fish no, std::array is an aggregate, so it can have no such constructor. The problem is that it may be implemented as having a single array as element, which is why the extra braces are required. –  juanchopanza Jul 31 '12 at 8:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 41 down vote accepted

The extra braces is needed because std::array is an aggregate and POD, unlike other containers in the standard library. std::array doesn't have user-defined constructor. It's first data member is an array of size N (which you pass as template argument), and this member is directly initialized with initializer. The extra braces is needed for the internal array which is directly being initialized.

The situation is same as:

//define this aggregate - no user-defined constructor
struct Aarray
{
   A data[2];  //data is an internal array!
};

How would initialize this? If you do this:

Aarray a1 =
{
   {0, 0.1},
   {2, 3.4}
};

it gives compilation error:

error: too many initializers for 'Aarray'

It is the same error which you get in case of std::array also (if you use GCC)!

So the correct way use is to use braces as:

Aarray a1 =
{
  {  //<--this tells the compiler that initialization of `data` starts!

        { //<-- initialization of `data[0]` starts!

           0, 0.1

        }, //<-- initialization of `data[0]` ends

       {2, 3.4}  //initialization of data[1] starts and ends, as above!

  } //<--this tells the compiler that initialization of `data` ends!
};

which compiles fine. Once again the extra braces is needed because you're initializing the internal array.

--

Now the question is, why extra braces is not needed in case of double?

It is because double is not an aggregate, while A is. In other words, std::array<double, 2> is an aggregate of aggregate, while std::array<A, 2> is an aggregate of aggregate of aggregate1.

1. I think that extra braces is still needed in case of double also (like this), to be completely the Standard conformant, but it works without it. It seems I need to dig the spec again!.

More on braces and extra braces

I dig the spec. This section (§8.5.1/11 from C++11) is interesting and applies to this case:

In a declaration of the form

T x = { a };

braces can be elided in an initializer-list as follows. If the initializer-list begins with a left brace, then the succeeding comma-separated list of initializer-clauses initializes the members of a subaggregate; it is erroneous for there to be more initializer-clauses than members. If, however, the initializer-list for a subaggregate does not begin with a left brace, then only enough initializer-clauses from the list are taken to initialize the members of the subaggregate; any remaining initializer-clauses are left to initialize the next member of the aggregate of which the current subaggregate is a member. [ Example:

float y[4][3] = { { 1, 3, 5 }, { 2, 4, 6 }, { 3, 5, 7 }, };

is a completely-braced initialization: 1, 3, and 5 initialize the first row of the array y[0], namely y[0][0], y[0][1], and y[0][2]. Likewise the next two lines initialize y[1] and y[2]. The initializer ends early and therefore y[3]s elements are initialized as if explicitly initialized with an expression of the form float(), that is, are initialized with 0.0. In the following example, braces in the initializer-list are elided; however the initializer-list has the same effect as the completely-braced initializer-list of the above example,

float y[4][3] = { 1, 3, 5, 2, 4, 6, 3, 5, 7 };

The initializer for y begins with a left brace, but the one for y[0] does not, therefore three elements from the list are used. Likewise the next three are taken successively for y[1] and y[2]. —end example ]

Based on what I understood from the above quote, I can say that the following should be allowed:

//OKAY. Braces are completely elided for the inner-aggregate!
std::array<A, 2> X =   
{
  0, 0.1,
  2, 3.4
};

//OKAY. Completely-braced initialization!
std::array<A, 2> Y = 
{{
   {0, 0.1},
   {2, 3.4}
}};

In the first one braces for inner-aggregate are completely-elided, while the second is completely-braced initialization. In your case (the case of double), the initialization uses the first approach (braces are completely elided for the inner aggregate!).

But this should be disallowed:

//ILL-FORMED : it is neither!
std::array<A, 2> Z = 
{
  {0, 0.1},
  {2, 3.4}
};

It is neither braces-elided, nor are there enough braces to be completely-braced initialization. Therefore, it is an ill-formed!

share|improve this answer
1  
An interesting, related post here. To me it is not clear at all that the array has to be implemented as a single-element aggregate. The standard provides an example implementation to emphasize that it is an aggregate, but I see no requirement that it be implemented so (although I cannot currently think of an alternative implementation). –  juanchopanza Jul 31 '12 at 8:11
1  
Great answer! Just found more compilable initializers for struct D from the question: D d1 = {1,2,3,4}; D d2 = {{1,2,3,4}}; –  Andrey Jul 31 '12 at 8:30
3  
For those not clicking the link @juanchopanza posted, there is link to an official defect report about the brace elision limitation. –  Tamás Szelei Jul 31 '12 at 8:36
1  
It is not necessary for a type to be a POD for brace elision to apply. Furthermore, something like std::array<std::string> is plainly not a POD. –  Luc Danton Aug 1 '12 at 9:29

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