Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on my first Android app, a math game for my kid, and am learning Java in the process. I have two ArrayLists, one of integers 0..9 and one strings of possible operations, at present, just + and -.

I would like to write a method that returns a random index into an ArrayList, so I can select a random element. What I'm running into is that I need two methods, one for each type of ArrayList, even though the code is identical. Is there a way to do this in a single method?

What I use now:

Random randomGenerator = new Random();

  . . .

n = randomIndexInt(possibleOperands);
int op1 = possibleOperands.get(n);
n = randomIndexInt(possibleOperands);
int op2 = possibleOperands.get(n);
n = randomIndexStr(possibleOperations);
String operation = possibleOperations.get(n);

    . . .

int randomIndexInt(ArrayList<Integer> a){
    int n = randomGenerator.nextInt(a.size());
    return n;
}

int randomIndexStr(ArrayList<String> a){
    int n = randomGenerator.nextInt(a.size());
    return n;
}

What I'd like to do is collapse randomIndexInt and randomIndexStr into a single method.

share|improve this question
    
You can write a method that will take A (of type int) as an argument and return any random number between 0 and A and call this method passing your array list sizes. –  Andrew Logvinov Jul 31 '12 at 7:18
    
Remember to accept an answer, and maybe +1 if you like someone else as well :) –  Anders Metnik Jul 31 '12 at 7:43
1  
+1 for coding a math game for your kid. –  irrelephant Jul 31 '12 at 8:47
    
Thanks, all, with the help I got here I was able to improve the method further, and my code now looks like this: int op1 = (Integer) getRandomElement(possibleOperands); int op2 = (Integer) getRandomElement(possibleOperands); String operation = (String) getRandomElement(possibleOperations); . . . Object getRandomElement(ArrayList<?> a){ int n = randomGenerator.nextInt(a.size()); return a.get(n); } Apologies, I can't get this comment to format correctly. –  codingatty Jul 31 '12 at 17:34

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

declare your method as int randomIndexInt(ArrayList<?> a)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that worked perfectly. –  codingatty Jul 31 '12 at 13:56
3  
It could just be Collection<?> since that's what declares size(). –  Paul Bellora Jul 31 '12 at 17:19

You need only the size of the array right? so do it:

int randomIndex(int size){
    int n = randomGenerator.nextInt(size);
    return n;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That's another approach, and one I'd done earlier, but I actually wanted to push as much common code as possible (including getting the Array size) into the method. –  codingatty Jul 31 '12 at 14:46

with this code you can pass any type of list

int randomIndex(List<?> list){
    int n = randomGenerator.nextInt(list.size());
    return n;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks; that worked okay with the array, but the int array chokes it as a primitive type. I suppose I could use Integer instead of int, but the <?> approach fixed it nicely. –  codingatty Jul 31 '12 at 13:57
    
You wouldn't be able to pass a List<Integer> or a List<String> into this method. –  Paul Bellora Jul 31 '12 at 17:08
    
Ups, I forget about generics cast. Thanks @PaulBellora. –  neworld Jul 31 '12 at 17:37

just make it:

private int randomIndex(int size){
return randomGenerator(size);
}

And then call them with randomIndex(yourArray.size());

share|improve this answer

More generic is to use List than ArrayList in method signature.

int your_method(List<?> a){
//your code
}
share|improve this answer
int randomIndex1(ArrayList<?> a)
{
   int n = randomGenerator.nextInt(a.size());
   return n;
}

int randomIndex2(int size)
{
   int n = randomGenerator.nextInt(size);
   return n;
}
share|improve this answer

you can use Generics as follows

declare your function as below

private <T> int randomIndex(ArrayList<T> a){
    int n = randomGenerator.nextInt(a.size());
    return n;
}

now you can pass ArrayList<String> or ArrayList<Integer> to this function without any issue like this

ArrayList<String> strList = new ArrayList<String>();
strList.add("on1");
System.out.println(randomIndex(strList));
ArrayList<Integer> intList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
intList.add(1);
System.out.println(randomIndex(intList));
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.