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I m newbie to programming. Please help me with this question.

when i execute this program, program will crash. can anybody tell me the exact reason for the crash?

#include<stdio.h>    
#include<string.h>    
#include<vector>    
using namespace std;    

struct s  
{  
    char *str;  
};  

std::vector<struct s> v;  
int main()  
{  
    struct s s1;  
    strcpy(s1.str,"hi");  
    v.push_back(s1);  
    strcpy(s1.str,"hello");  
    v.push_back(s1);  
    strcpy(s1.str,"How are you");  
    v.push_back(s1);  
    strcpy(s1.str,"AMAZING");  
    v.push_back(s1);  
    for (int i=0;i<(int)v.size();i++)  
    {           
        printf("%s\n",v[i].str);  
    }  
    return 0;  
}  

i am compiling it in devc++. pls help.

share|improve this question
    
#1 what shall your program accomplish #2 what is the error code –  Sim Jul 31 '12 at 9:24
    
use __declspec(align(16)) char[] to make it faster –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 31 '12 at 9:25
2  
@tuğrulbüyükışık: wtf? First of all, that is very compiler specific, second of all forcing alignment will often make your program slower, not faster, third of all: this is a newbie question about a crash, not some advanced optimization question :s. –  KillianDS Jul 31 '12 at 9:32
    
@KillianDS: OMG? He is newbie and started from vectors & pointers? VC++ 10.0 express 's strlen(char * str) includes a loop that checks if str is aligned. Making str aligned in the declaration makes strlen-like functions work faster for some small-length strings. –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 31 '12 at 9:37
    
@tuğrulbüyükışık: automatic storage and dynamic storage (using new) should be aligned correctly without specification. specifying an alignment can result in something sub-optimal for your specific platform. –  KillianDS Jul 31 '12 at 9:50

6 Answers 6

No memory has been allocated for str and struct s is violating the rule of three: use std::string instead.

You don't need to specify struct s (you do in C) when declaring a type of s, just use s:

std::vector<s> v;

s s1;

You could make struct s more convenient to use by providing a constructor:

struct s
{
    s(const std::string& a_s) : str(a_s) {}
    std::string str;
};

v.push_back(s("hi"));
share|improve this answer

You haven't allocated any memory for s1.str to point at. You're writing via an unitialized pointer, giving undefined behavior.

Try something like:

struct s { 
    std::string str;
};

s s1;

s1.str = "hi";
v.push_back(s1);
// etc.

better still, just use a string directly, and a C++11 initializer list:

std::vector<std::string> v{"hi", "hello", "how are you", "AMAZING"};

std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"));
share|improve this answer

You don't allocated memory for char *str; in your struct

just take a look at the strcpy documentation: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstring/strcpy/

The memory were you are copying must be allocated. But when you write:

char *str; 

memory is not allocated. You've just created a pointer (to garbage)

You can allocated the memory or better use std::string, because memory management will be done for you in that case

share|improve this answer

You are not allocating memory in s.str.

share|improve this answer
    
thank u all... allocating memory using new has solved my problem.... –  user1565169 Jul 31 '12 at 12:00

You are experiencing Undefined Behavior. Your char * str is just a pointe,r with no memory allocated. Nevertheless, you try to modify the memory it points to. Since that memory doesn't belong to your program, you are getting a crash.

Since it's UB, you can't really tell what will happen. For example, for me this code runs.

share|improve this answer

You need to allocate memory for s1, before using it (uniniatialized pointers point to garbage).. use new for that once done don't forget to release the memory using delete operator..

I suggest you to have a look in some good C++ tutorials,

  1. see this link
  2. Another good C++ resource

Note I have edited (changed) this answer since all others answer correctly address the problem. I just wanted to add few cents to them.

share|improve this answer
1  
mallocs and c-style casts in a C++ program? That's not something you should learn to a novice programmer. You even forgot the free's. Also, you do not need to allocate memory for s1, it's an automatic storage variable. –  KillianDS Jul 31 '12 at 9:33
    
@KillianDS good points... I actually didn't notice that its C++ program... #stupidMe... updating my answer for that.... Thanks –  amit Jul 31 '12 at 9:47

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