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I'm looking for a function which will replace all occurrences of one value with another value. For example I'd like to replace all zeros with ones. I don't want to have to store the result in a variable, but want to be able to use the vector anonymously as part of a larger expression.

I know how to write a suitable function myself:

> vrepl <- function(haystack, needle, replacement) {
+   haystack[haystack == needle] <- replacement
+   return(haystack)
+ }
> 
> vrepl(c(3, 2, 1, 0, 4, 0), 0, 1)
[1] 3 2 1 1 4 1

But I'm wondering whether there is some standard function to do this job, preferrably from the base package, as an alternative from some other commonly used package. I believe that using such a standard will likely make my code more readable, and I won't have to redefine that function wherever I need it.

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2  
Is something like as.numeric(gsub(0, 1, c(3, 2, 1, 0, 4, 0))) useful? –  Ananda Mahto Jul 31 '12 at 9:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Perhaps replace is what you are looking for:

> x = c(3, 2, 1, 0, 4, 0)
> replace(x, x==0, 1)
[1] 3 2 1 1 4 1

Or, if you don't have x (any specific reason why not?):

replace(c(3, 2, 1, 0, 4, 0), c(3, 2, 1, 0, 4, 0)==0, 1)

Many people are familiar with gsub, so you can also try either of the following:

as.numeric(gsub(0, 1, x))
as.numeric(gsub(0, 1, c(3, 2, 1, 0, 4, 0)))

Update

After reading the comments, perhaps with is an option:

with(data.frame(x = c(3, 2, 1, 0, 4, 0)), replace(x, x == 0, 1))
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Remember that this doesn't change x unless reassigned. –  Ananda Mahto Jul 31 '12 at 10:06
    
The specific reason why not to name x is that the expression computing x might itself be rather long. And I want to avoid clobbering my namespace with too many variables. So I had hoped for a way to avoid having to name the vector, or having to duplicate its expression. gsub and its character intermediate doesn't feel right either, in terms of performance as well as precision, particularly when dealing with floating point numbers. –  MvG Jul 31 '12 at 10:21
    
I definitely could and should use replace in my own vrepl implementation, unless someone will come up with an answer which obsoletes my own function altogether. So thanks for pointing that out! –  MvG Jul 31 '12 at 10:24
    
@MvG, what about: with(data.frame(x = c(3, 2, 1, 0, 4, 0)), replace(x, x == 0, 1))? –  Ananda Mahto Jul 31 '12 at 17:32
    
I like that with approach. –  MvG Jul 31 '12 at 20:51

Another simpler option is to do:

 > x = c(1, 1, 2, 4, 5, 2, 1, 3, 2)
 > x[x==1] <- 0
 > x
 [1] 0 0 2 4 5 2 0 3 2
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This requires saving the intermediate result to a named variable, which I want to avoid, as I stated in my question. –  MvG Jul 31 '12 at 10:25
    
@MvG: sorry, missed that part. Anyway it is much more maintainable to save it in a variable –  nico Jul 31 '12 at 12:54

The ifelse function would be a quick and easy way to do this.

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I would have to give the same vector twice, once for the test argument, and once as one of the result arguments, right? Doesn't seem any easier than the replace call mrdwab suggested. –  MvG Jul 31 '12 at 20:53
    
Correct, but you could save it in a temporary variable and just reference that twice. ifelse and replace will both do the job. –  Greg Snow Jul 31 '12 at 21:13

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