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Why a char variable gets 'b' from assignment of 'ab', rather 'a'?

char c = 'ab';

printf("c: %c\n", c);

Prints:

c: b
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is implementation defined as earlier answers already say.

My gcc handles 'ab' as an int. The following code:

printf( "sizeof('ab') = %zu \n", sizeof('ab') );
printf( "'ab' = 0x%08x \n", 'ab' );
printf( "'abc' = 0x%08x \n", 'abc' );

prints:

sizeof('ab') = 4
'ab' = 0x00006162
'abc' = 0x00616263

In your code, the line:

char c = 'ab';

Can be considered as:

char c = (char)(0x00006162 & 0xFF);

So c gets the value of the last char of 'ab'. In this case it is 'b' (0x62).

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According to the standard, it is implementation defined. From 6.4.4.4 Character constants:

An integer character constant has type int. The value of an integer character constant containing a single character that maps to a single-byte execution character is the numerical value of the representation of the mapped character interpreted as an integer. The value of an integer character constant containing more than one character (e.g., 'ab'), or containing a character or escape sequence that does not map to a single-byte execution character, is implementation-defined.

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1  
@ouah, how does it not? It is stating that it is up to the implementation what int value it assigns to a multi-character literal. –  hmjd Jul 31 '12 at 9:55
    
@ouah It doesn't matter what the value of a single character constant is, 'b' is still represented as 'b'. This answer does answer the question why 'b' rather than 'a' (namely, it's up to the implementation), which your answer doesn't even touch. –  Jim Balter Jul 31 '12 at 9:58
    
@JimBalter actually the OP edited his question to add the rather than 'a' which IMHO change a little bit the intentions of the original question. –  ouah Jul 31 '12 at 10:01

The value of an integer multi-character constant is implementation-defined, according to C11 standard (§6.4.4.4 "Character constants" al10 p69) :

10 - [...] The value of an integer character constant containing more than one character (e.g., 'ab'), or containing a character or escape sequence that does not map to a single-byte execution character, is implementation-defined. [...]

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The C90 and C99 standards have the same rule. –  Keith Thompson Aug 6 '12 at 21:00

Because 'ab' has type int and a char can only hold one byte.

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That doesn't answer the question, which is why it gets 'b' rather than 'a', not why it gets 'b' rather than 'ab'. –  Jim Balter Jul 31 '12 at 9:56
    
@JimBalter the question was edited and didn't have the rather than 'a' at the time I answered. –  ouah Jul 31 '12 at 10:03
1  
P.S. Since this is a C question, 'a' and 'b' also have type int. –  Jim Balter Jul 31 '12 at 10:04
    
Sorry, I didn't notice the edit. But please adjust your answer to fit the current question. –  Jim Balter Jul 31 '12 at 10:06

Later edit: my answer was complementary to the ones before that stated pretty clearly that this is implementation specific behavior. I was under the impression the OP wanted to know, with that in mind, why the compiler chose 'b' over 'a'. Sorry if my answer was confusing.

Endianess. That's why you get 'b' instead of 'a'. Because of how that is represented in your machine's memory. And your machine is probably little endian.

Try it on a sparc or on a mipsbe or on an arm and you might get 'a' instead of 'b'.

In any case I hope you're not depending on this for actual production code.

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No only endianess. Even the order of characters in the value itself is undefined. Different compilers with the same endians use different representation (e.g. GCC vs. Visual Studio). –  Suma Jul 31 '12 at 11:12
    
Indeed. But I thought that was already settled by the answers before. I was only trying to clear up why the OP might get 'b's instead of 'a's in his test. The compiler might choose the easy way of representing and accessing that depending on the platform it's running on. –  Paul Irofti Jul 31 '12 at 11:53

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